A Review and sharpening (a la Paul's method) of Woodriver's Butt Chisels

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This topic contains 9 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  STEVE MASSIE 3 years ago.

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  • #137074

    MartyBacke
    Participant

    I just purchased this $50 set of Woodriver Butt Chisels. I offer a closer look at them and prepare one for use.

    #137947

    jeffpolaski
    Participant

    Marty, I sort of like your diamond stone setup. Right now, starting to use DMT’s, I’ve simply put the stone on non-slip backing on a larger phenolic flat board and switched one stone for another.
    Did your stones come with what look like small rubber/plastic legs at the corners, or is that your doing? Lifting them a fraction of an inch up off the base seems as if it would make them easier to handle and clean.
    Also. when you sandpapered the Harbor Freight, what did you put the sand paper on. It would seem that my phenolic-faced board might do double duty.

    I learned from your videos. My other comment forgot to mention that I did get a HB $10 No. 33 plane, with the intention of converting it a’la Paul Sellers to a scrub plane, but then I picked up a genuine Stanley No. 40 Scrub in Maine and it’s done the job for me. Do you think the HF No. 33 plane would be good for, well, repelling unwanted boarders?

    Thanks from Philly. — Jeff

    #137949

    MartyBacke
    Participant

    Hi Jeff,

    I love my DMT stones. Up to about a year ago I would just place them on my bench. Then I made the setup you see in the video which is much better since it’s always ready to go.

    I bought square rubber feet/bumpers from the big box store and place them on the plates. Helps a lot to keep them from moving as you are using them.

    I clamped the sandpaper to my jointer bed which is of course very flat. But any flat surface will obviously work.

    Funny No 33 comment. I haven’t been using it much, but it’s intended for use on the edges of plywood which are too hard (all the glue lines) on my nicer planes.

    #138444

    STEVE MASSIE
    Participant

    Marty thanks for the review of the Woodriver Butt chisels they do like a nice set. I was also impressed with your Workmate up grades, I have ( 2 ) and that is what I used to build my Paul Sellers style bench. I like your accessories very much and will adapt those to mine as I sometimes work outdoors, or go over my Daughter’s or Son’s home’s to help them with projects. Sure makes the Workbench very versital. I enjoyed your other video’s as well, thanks for sharing some great tips.

    Steve

    Steve Massie, I live in the great State of Florida, US

    #138449

    jeffpolaski
    Participant

    Marty or Steve,
    I am just now assembling a basic $20 Workmate. Never had so much trouble since my Lionel train set. The instructions, written in China, are confusing at best. A friend is helping me and the local hardware store keeps coming up with usable substitutes for missing parts. (Another reason to frequent your local ever-diminishing supply of hardware stores.

    I would be very interested in Marty’s additions. I spend five weeks in Maine in the Autumn (“Maine, the way life should be”) and I’d like to take the Workmate in the back of the van. Better than trying to fit a cheap clamp onto a picnic table. Direction to Marty’s entry would be appreciated.

    On the topic, I assembled a Harbor Freight bench grinder stand (cheap), drilled a 3/4″ hole in the middle and mounted a couple 3/4″ boards on top, complete with hole. A Veritas carving clamp went into the hole and it is very stable. I’m going to dismount the clamp temporarily, pad another board or two on top (I left bolt holes for this) and try using it as a chopping block for smallish logs. First up is a one foot long cherry log maybe a foot wide, and a brand new froe I cheated a bt with and gave it more of an edge. We’ll see how to fasten the chunk of wood, but I want to get the bark off after a year’s aging, and see if the heartwood is usable. It if works, it beats the heck out of buying and transporting a log chopping block that weighs a good part of a hundred pounds.

    http://www.harborfreight.com/universal-bench-grinder-stand-3184.html#reviews (wait for a sale)

    #138451

    MartyBacke
    Participant

    Hi Jeff,

    If you go to my YouTube channel (http://www.youtube.com/martybacke), the latest (as of July 10th) video is about my Workmate modifications.

    #138456

    MartyBacke
    Participant

    Thanks for those nice comments Steve. Glad you picked up some useful Workmate tips. I’ve certainly got a lot of use from mine. I used it to build my first workbench too.

    [quote quote=138444]Marty thanks for the review of the Woodriver Butt chisels they do like a nice set. I was also impressed with your Workmate up grades, I have ( 2 ) and that is what I used to build my Paul Sellers style bench. I like your accessories very much and will adapt those to mine as I sometimes work outdoors, or go over my Daughter’s or Son’s home’s to help them with projects. Sure makes the Workbench very versital. I enjoyed your other video’s as well, thanks for sharing some great tips.

    Steve

    [/quote]

    [quote quote=138444]Marty thanks for the review of the Woodriver Butt chisels they do like a nice set. I was also impressed with your Workmate up grades, I have ( 2 ) and that is what I used to build my Paul Sellers style bench. I like your accessories very much and will adapt those to mine as I sometimes work outdoors, or go over my Daughter’s or Son’s home’s to help them with projects. Sure makes the Workbench very versital. I enjoyed your other video’s as well, thanks for sharing some great tips.

    Steve

    [/quote]

    #138458

    jeffpolaski
    Participant

    Went to your YouTube on Workmate and it’s definitely the solution for when we move into the retirement community. I can sneak it in a piece at a time under the raincoat, what do you think? Great jig making!
    I have a tabletop WorkMate, which they don’t make any more, but diligent eBay prowling paid off. It goes in the van, goes to Maine and goes on the table. Tilts 45 degrees for relief carving.
    I see you like Veritas stuff: The larger formed back saws and the hold-downs are on my lengthy list.
    Question: was the bench bull made from 3×3 or 4×4 lumber? And that melamine 1″ board looks like one I have across two saw horses instead of in an Ikea wardrobe closet.
    So much to do, and so little time. Your WorkMate 400 would add quite a bit of space, though. Have to say that.
    Mazel Tov and have a great time with it.

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    • This reply was modified 3 years, 1 month ago by  jeffpolaski.
    • This reply was modified 3 years, 1 month ago by  jeffpolaski.
    • This reply was modified 3 years, 1 month ago by  jeffpolaski.
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    #138464

    MartyBacke
    Participant

    I’ve seen those table top versions before. You could almost think of them as a version of a Bench Bull.

    I made mine from a fir 4×4 post bought at the big box store. The beauty is that you can make them from just about anything and as big or small as you want. The sky’s the limit 🙂

    #139219

    STEVE MASSIE
    Participant

    Actually I have ( 3 ) Workmates I forgot the little table top one, it is butied some where when we moved from Atlanta to the Orlando area. I used it quite a bit and was very handy at times.

    Steve

    Steve Massie, I live in the great State of Florida, US

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