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  • #137380
    Matt McGrane
    Participant

    Last week while vacationing in Paris, I went to the Louvre museum and saw some OLD furniture. I don’t mean 18th or 17th century, I mean the 15th century B.C. One of the pieces was from ancient Egypt and was made about 3500 years ago. The remarkable thing is that the chair design is very similar to the Paul Sellers dining chair. Upper and lower seat rails joined to legs with M&T. Rear legs extending higher to create the backrest. The joinery techniques are basically the same as those used today by us (not by Ikea or other mass makers). Sometimes I think of our craft as having been perfected through the last few centuries. But clearly it goes back so much farther. Imagine making this chair with the tools available at the time. Keep in mind this was the age of bronze – no hardened steel or even iron.

    I blogged about it here (https://tinyshopww.blogspot.com/) if you care to read a little more about it. It’s the entry for May 21.

    p.s. I’m having problems adding photos and captions. Hope you can see them. Some captions may be with the wrong photo, but you’ll get the jist.

    Matt, Northern California - Started a blog in 2016: http://tinyshopww.blogspot.com/

    • This topic was modified 4 years, 5 months ago by Matt McGrane.
    • This topic was modified 4 years, 5 months ago by Matt McGrane. Reason: Problems uploading photos and adding captions
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    #137389
    Ed
    Participant

    Just goes to show, the human butt has been following us around for a very, very long time, pretty much unchanged in form and function. This really is an amazing chair when you think about the things you point out. I shouldn’t crack jokes.

    #137391
    Peter George
    Participant

    That is very cool Matt.

    Peter in
    Biggar SK
    "New York is big, but this is Biggar"

    #137398
    pnj2411
    Participant

    That’s amazing Matt. Look how tight some of the tenons still are.
    I wonder what the wood is.
    If someone showed me that design I would have said – “No, seat rails are too thin in the vertical dimension, it won’t last”. Shows what I know 🙂

    Manxman living in France

    #137402
    Matt McGrane
    Participant

    @ed – Ed, is that “I shouldn’t crack jokes” or “I shouldn’t joke about cracks”?



    @pnj2411
    – There was no indication (that I saw) about the wood species. It’s a good point about the seat rail vertical dimension. But a full set (front, back, and both sides) of upper and lower seat rails probably helps there. The information card was in French and the Google translation wasn’t really clear, but it might have meant that the chair spent centuries in a tomb with some bigwig, so not too much abuse. If you know French well, would you be willing to look at my blog entry (the link to the blog is above and there’s a picture of the French info card) and tell me if there is a better translation than what I got from Google?

    Matt, Northern California - Started a blog in 2016: http://tinyshopww.blogspot.com/

    #137428
    pnj2411
    Participant

    Certainly:

    [Left card]
    Chair
    Qurnet Murai, western cemetery, wood and straw

    [Middle Card]
    Items mostly from the western cemetery of Qurnet Murai (opposite Deir el-Medinch). Middle of the 18th dynasty (about 1,450 BC), a period when they still placed furniture that had really been used into tombs.

    [Right Card]
    Storage basket
    Qurnet Murai, western cemetery, esparto [Stipa tenacisissimahad to look that one up!] and palm leaves

    So it implies that the chair was a real, used example.
    Maybe people were lighter then 🙂

    Manxman living in France

    #137446
    Matt McGrane
    Participant

    @pnj2411 – thanks for that Manxman. That makes better sense with your translation.

    Matt, Northern California - Started a blog in 2016: http://tinyshopww.blogspot.com/

    #137550
    STEVE MASSIE
    Participant

    Thanks for sharing Matt, that was pretty cool. It would be interesting to see what tools they used back then.

    Steve

    Steve Massie, I live in the great State of Florida, US

    #137557
    Matt McGrane
    Participant

    @smassiesr – I agree Steve, that would be fascinating. Until they build the time machine, I guess we’ll have to wonder. …

    Matt, Northern California - Started a blog in 2016: http://tinyshopww.blogspot.com/

    #138529
    Steve Giles
    Participant

    I’m no expert, but the wood looks a little like walnut.

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