Any idea what this is?

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    Topic
  • #553792
    garnettmcmillangarnettmcmillan
    Participant

    Found it at the bottom of an old chest…

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Viewing 11 replies - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
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  • #553794
    peter joyceroofusson
    Participant

    @roofusson

    Though not sure from the Pic. It may be a plumbers tap re setter. Cheers Peter

    #553795
    deanbeckerdeanbecker
    Participant

    @deanbecker

    do the cutters go all the way to the middle ? if so it is a seat lathe for old faucets

    #553796
    garnettmcmillangarnettmcmillan
    Participant

    @garnettmcmillan

    They do and it is! Thanks @deanbecker @roofusson

    #553897
    EdEd
    Participant

    @ed

    @deanbecker , @roofusson do these actually work? How risky is trying if I get a new one from the hardware store? I have some old taps in a shower stall that eat washers. After a couple months, it looks like the seats grind a groove around the washer and then, drip, drip, drip. I have no idea if I could find new seats and have been hesitant to try to remove the ones that are in there. This stall is reasonably old, a funny size, and fiberglass, so if I start monkeying with installing new taps or even a mixer valve, it could end badly. I’m not much of a plumber, so I just keep offering up washer sacrifices to the plumbing gods. Is it worth trying one of these?

    #553898
    deanbeckerdeanbecker
    Participant

    @deanbecker

    They do ed but were made way before the replaceable seats were inventd.
    Depending on a lot of variables it could solve the problem. As with any tool a light hand and a careful alignmntare a mist.
    If your valve isnt 60-70 years old or a commercial fixturei think i would go the. Replacement seat route. A cheap seat remmover can be had for a few bucks. Most are universal. I usually cut the endd off so they grip good and dont bottm out on the back of the valve then screw them out.

    #553900
    EdEd
    Participant

    @ed

    Well, the place was built approximately 1950, so it could 60-70 years old, but my impression is that this stall was added later. It’s hard to say. These things have certainly been here for quite a while, so if I try to replace the seats, should I anticipate needing a lot of torque to remove them? Are they both right handed threads? (One tap shuts off CCW, the other CW). Are seats fairly easy to match, or might I get them out just to discover I can’t find a match?

    #553902
    deanbeckerdeanbecker
    Participant

    @deanbecker

    Usually there is a name on the trim somewhere. You can turn off the water , remove a stem and view the seat with a light
    It will usually have either a square or hex cnter they have all been right hand i have changed
    A lot depends on your water quality how they come out

    #553906
    EdEd
    Participant

    @ed

    I’ll have a look. The trim on these taps are toilet escutcheons. : -) Thanks again for your help.

    #553980
    EdEd
    Participant

    @ed

    @deanbecker here’s a photo of the seat. It doesn’t look replaceable to me. Here, too, is a washer after just a couple weeks.

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    #554000
    deanbeckerdeanbecker
    Participant

    @deanbecker

    Is that ceramic around the seat? And are you in the U S ?
    I have no expriance with european fixtures
    If U S
    I would try a square shank seat remmover tool as the top “crack” goes from top to bottom, the seat tool only does the top surface. Drive it tight and turn slowly to the left. The stem is newer production it appears. i would venture the seat is replaceable.
    A caveat. Always a caviet

    #554002
    EdEd
    Participant

    @ed

    Yup, US. No ceramic…just funny light. It’s hard to see these photos properly. You’re looking down a cylinder about an inch or two long, which then steps in 1/16th or so. That’s ring with a bit of green at its edge. The bore then continues another 1/2 inch or so at a smaller diameter. You can’t really see the walls of this part in the photo…it just looks like a dark ring. The two innermost doughnuts are the seat. The outer one is further back and the inner one stands proud and is what meets with the washer. The thing that looks like a screw slot is back behind the seat on the far side of the control (and isn’t a slot…you can’t even get the tip of a screwdriver to bite into it). Looking at it up close, I didn’t see anything for a tool to grab to remove the seat, so it really looked like an integrated seat. Soon after posting, I went ahead and bought a reseating tool, dressed the seat, and put it back together. We’ll know in a few weeks if it helped. There was a bit of chatter left from the reseating tool, but it looked minor. It takes very little force to shut off the valve, just gentle finger tips, so it might just work.

    • This reply was modified 4 months ago by EdEd.
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