Bailey No. 6 Corrugated

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  • #611698
    John Grogan
    Participant

    Hello everyone;

    I purchased ($25)a batch of woodworking items auger bits, brace, etc but it also included this old No. 6. I noticed on previous topics that to repair a crack in the body of a plane may not be worth it. Would this be the case here?

    It’s not something I would tackle anytime soon but if not worth it I will keep the knob and handle for another restoration.

    Thank you in advance, John

    Dripping Springs, Texas
    First met Paul when he lived is Texas. So happy he is active online. We are all blessed for his generosity.
    Would be happy to meet anyone in the Austin area who also follows Paul's work.

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    #611764
    Larry Geib
    Participant

    Depends what your skills are at brazing or welding. I have a #7 that had a crack that bad that a welder friend did up with a nickel rod. After a lot of grinding and lapping, it’s hard to see. But that cheek weld tends to Pringle the sole, so you will have to do a lot of lapping.

    Brazing is easier, but isn’t as strong or pretty, though I see lots of the #’s 10-10 1/2 with that repair all the time.

    Three patent dates and large adjuster makes it atype 12 – WWI era. Type 6 was the plane I used most for door hanging. Mine is late sweetheart.

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    #611907
    Dave Ring
    Participant

    Having the crack professionally welded or braze would probably cost more than the value of a good No.6. If you don’t opt for a repair, a least save the complete frog assembly in addition to the wooden parts. Sooner or later you will run across a 4 1/2, 6, or 7 with a broken frog and/or missing lever cap and iron/chipbreaker assemby that you can pick up for peanuts.

    Dave

    #612355
    John Grogan
    Participant

    Thank you Larry and Dave for your feedback. I will leave it aside for now and come back to it later. Another option I thought of is to use it exclusively with a shooting board. With a good cleaning, sharpening and leveling the sole and no repair of the crack, I’m wondering if this is a good workable solution. I figure the cracked cheek is riding on the bottom of the shooting board and so is under very little stress. Thoughts?

    Peace, John

    Dripping Springs, Texas
    First met Paul when he lived is Texas. So happy he is active online. We are all blessed for his generosity.
    Would be happy to meet anyone in the Austin area who also follows Paul's work.

    #612442
    Dave Ring
    Participant

    Why not? It might work OK and if not, so what?

    Dave

    #612499
    Larry Geib
    Participant

    I’ve seen everything from a steel plate screwed to the side to JB weld.

    Amazingly, they all worked for a time. For a shooting plane, an 1/8” rectangular plate as the “sole”has a certain appeal.

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 2 months ago by Larry Geib.
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