Colen Clenton's Try Squares

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Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
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  • #10056
    Ken
    Participant

    Interesting little video

     

    #10058
    STEVE MASSIE
    Participant

    Hi Ken ……….  I agree I saw this on Chris Schwarz Blog that he posted when he was in Australia.  Neat looking square but I am sure it is pricey as well.

     

    Steve

    Steve Massie, I live in the great State of Florida, US

    #10063
    Mihai
    Participant

    Interesting principle  , Thanks.

    mihai

    #10066
    Dave
    Participant

    They are expensive tools but I would imagine they are a once in a lifetime purchase.

    -Canada

    #10072
    Scott
    Participant

    They are expensive tools but I would imagine they are a once in a lifetime purchase.

    A great try-square indeed, but I would go broke if I used that logic on everything I purchased.

    Perhaps I am cheap, but I consider this a luxury tool. It is clever and certainly solves the problems that plague typical try-squares, but there are other lifetime tools (like a Starrett Combination Square) that offer the same accuracy and are much less expensive.

    In one of Jim Kingshott’s videos, he recommends the use of a Machinist Square instead of a traditional Try-Square to combat issues of inaccuracy. That would be cheaper as well.

     

    -Scott Los Angeles

    #10075
    Dave
    Participant

    Scott, I didn’t mean to suggest people purchase that lol.  I use the inexpensive engineer squares lee valley sells.

    -Canada

    #10078
    Scott
    Participant

    Scott, I didn’t mean to suggest people purchase that lol. I use the inexpensive engineer squares lee valley sells.

    Heheh. I didn’t assume as much Dave.

    In a related note, I purchased a 12″ Craftsman square (after testing it for square) a while back when I was feeling particularly cheap, but recent testing of this Craftsman, another vintage 6″ Disston try-square and a 12″ wooden square made by DONOVAN revealed that none of them were truly square. I then noticed that the Craftsman square’s blade was bowed along its length. Obviously not a hardened rule. At that point I started to suspect that my marking technique might be causing the inaccuracy. Next I tested my 6″ Starrett and vintage 9″ Starrett, and they were dead on accurate.

    My conclusion: Crappy squares are worthless, whether $5 vintage or $20 new. Buy a decent square with a good reputation (i.e… PEC, Starrett, Brown & Sharpe), and make sure the rule is hardened steel.

    -Scott Los Angeles

    #10110
    Dave
    Participant

    Hardened steel is most important for doing the knife line scribing wall.  This is the one thing that the square in the video seems to lack, it looks like that blade is made out of brass and I could see myself shaving off the brass pretty easily with my knife.  I still swear by these.  http://www.leevalley.com/en/Wood/page.aspx?p=32601&cat=1,42936

    -Canada

    #10124
    Mihai
    Participant

    Hi,@ rroselavy , dave : The tool has its (huge)price ; The idea , instead -it’s priceless. Thank you.

     

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