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  • #623563
    Ed
    Participant

    Does anyone know what type of shooting board or other appliance would have been used to dress or adjust cornice / crown moulding with a plane? The point is that the moulding is both sprung (tilted away from the cabinet or wall) and mitered around a corner. I am thinking of moderate sized mouldings, maybe 4 to 5 inches across the face, that are not backed, so the material is only 3/4 to 1″ thick and am thinking of outside corner especially (not coped).

    #623599
    Larry Geib
    Participant

    You try to make the cut right first time in a miter box, with the crown inserted upside down and at the correct angle. Think of the bed of the miter box as the ceiling, and the back wall of the miter box as the wall.
    Remember you can open or close the top or bottom of a joint a little by how the trim sits on the wall, and you can relieve the back of a miter a little with a knife.
    Walls and ceilings are seldom square, so you need to learn to make the adjustments efficiently.
    Inside corners were coped, not mitered.

    Here is the process using a chop saw, but it’s the same with a hand box.

    We used to use a Lion mitre trimmer for production work to clean up the cuts. 4-5” was about the upper size limit for the crown in the tool.

    It was quicker and safer than a chop saw and left very smooth ends like a shooting board if you kept the blades sharp. The tool has been around for probably 100 years. Clones are available from Rockler, Highland Woodworking, and Wood River. Probably others. I have only ever used the original Lion brand. Before the advent of the chop saw, it was how cuts from a hand miter box were adjusted.

    I see them on the used market for maybe $50 or so, but they became redundant with slide compound saws and laser sights.

    There is one without a handle sitting in my local scrap yard u should probably rescue, but my production days are over.

    • This reply was modified 9 months ago by Larry Geib.
    • This reply was modified 9 months ago by Larry Geib.
    • This reply was modified 9 months ago by Larry Geib.
    #629146
    Ed
    Participant

    @LORENZOJOSE Thanks for the reply. The query was motivated by me tuning up the miter box from the other discussion but still not quite getting what I need, so I wondered if there was a way to tune with a plane. I think some of the problem is that, when cutting a 45 miter, the work is wiggling back and forth just a little because of the miter angle and this leaves the cut face not perfectly planar. It’s not easy finding a way to get a clamp onto the Stanley miter box, especially for crown.

    I remembered Paul’s old video about making a cornice and found he just touches up by hand with a plane. I’m going to play with that. See, https://woodworkingmasterclasses.com/videos/making-fitting-cornice/fitting-cornice-part-1/ . I thought this would break off the corner, but I think if you go the right direction, the miter means you aren’t going entirely across the grain, so it’s okay.

    #629171
    Larry Geib
    Participant

    You can end the wriggling around by pinning or clamping a stop strip on the bed that restricts movement.

    Most metal mitre boxes have stops built in as part of the design.

    You position the trim against the bed and the back wall, then set the stop. All your cuts will be bedded to the same angle.

    If the walls are square, very little touch up is required. The challenge comes when the walls aren’t pitched to the same angle but often that is left to the painter to caulk. In that video, you can see the trim isn’t bedded completely to wall and ceiling..

    And that why you should take care to build casework square.

    As to tuning a miter box, most have an eccentrically milled pivot, so you can change the position of the saw swing point slightly by turning it. Unless you know what you are doing, it’s just as easy to get it wrong as right, so I suggest you hold off on trying that until you are absolutely sure it is what is causing the problem, and not inadequate technique. It’s very rare that needs to change. I’ve used my box for 45 years without changing it, despite the box spending years in a truck.

    Electric boxes seem to need adjustment more often. A guess is because they are aluminum and not cast iron or steel.

    • This reply was modified 8 months, 2 weeks ago by Larry Geib.
    #629241
    Ed
    Participant

    Larry, thanks for the suggestions. The movement I was trying to describe isn’t from the spring angle. It’s not from the work trying to slide down the back fence. It’s movement parallel to the back fence caused by the cut being at 45 degrees and the teeth pushing into the work or dragging it back. There’s a small screw that can project from the back fence and can help stop the work, but it’s not in the right place for cornice work. For this particular shape, though, I think I can get a spring clamp on, which I’ll try. Previously, I was trying to cut picture frame material on the flat (simple miters), and that was scooting enough to be a real problem.

    #629267
    Larry Geib
    Participant

    You can glue some 80 or 60 grit paper to bed and/or back fence. ( 3M reposition spray adhesive or rubber cement work and are reversible) That’s pretty common for guys who had wood beds. Varnish or paint your bed and cleanup is easier. My box has a Metal bed surface like a coarse rasp, so I never had that issue. It didn’t occur to me that as your problem.

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