Dehumidifiers

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  • #622223
    Mark68
    Participant

    I thought I’d make a separate thread to discuss dehumidifiers. One particular model that comes with high praise is the Meaco DD8L Zambezi Dehumidifier.

    http://www.meaco.com/dehumidifier/home-dehumidifiers/meaco-dd8l-zambezi-dehumidifier-is-a-which-best-buy?filter=5-1-12-16&withawards=1

    Has anyone got a dehumidifier in their workshop, does it work? I’m looking to get one for my 6m x 5m single skin blog shed (UK climate).

    "Sawdust? I think you'll find that's man-glitter."

    #622577
    Dionysios P
    Participant

    In my single skin brick Garage/Workshop the relative humidity (RH) is about 80% most of the time in autumn/winter (Berkshire UK). The bricks seem to act like sponges that absorb water and slowly release it, even on dry days, increasing the humidity levels.

    In such an ocasion the dehumidifier should work 24/7 on it’s highest setting, and I am not sure that it will manage to decrease the RH effectively, adding, according to the specifications in your link, £878 to the annual electricity bill.

    Maybe you will be better off if you add some sort of insulation first and then consider the use of a dehumidifier or heating for your workshop.

    #622580
    Mark68
    Participant

    I’ve got 100mm kingspan in the roof but nothing on the walls.

    Would, heating the shed sort out the issue?

    EDIT: £878 isn’t an option. That’s around £16 a week. My wife would kill me.

    "Sawdust? I think you'll find that's man-glitter."

    #622677
    Sven-Olof Jansson
    Participant

    Hej Mark,

    My 56 sqm combined loft and workshop is kept at around 43% relative humidity thanks to a Wood’s DS40FS dehumidifier. This particular model might be a bit difficult to find in GB, but there are other models and, supposedly, brands with the same characteristics.

    1. Good fan that really circulates the air in the room. In a non-insulated room or a loft (roof heat generates a humidity gradient) the humidity is not evenly distributed, which makes air-circulation beneficial.

    2. Sufficient capacity. An undersized dehumidifier will consume a lot of electricity without perhaps reaching the desired relative humidity.

    3. Continous water drainage, and not into a tank that has to be emptied.

    4. Big enough filters that are easy to replace (and not to expensive). At least my workshop can be become dusty, despite being hand tools only.

    Insulation and heating will of course not only make for a more pleasant workshop, but also – which goes without saying – prevent condensation, as long the indoor temperature is above the dew point. A dehumidifier allows for drops in temperature (like day and night) without condensation. As room a reasonable room temperature makes working much more comfortable, and a controlled humidity prevents both tools corroding and wood warping, I’ve gone for both.

    Sven-Olof Jansson
    London, UK; Boston, MA

    #622686
    Mark68
    Participant

    Thank you for the information Sven. I’ll check out the Wood’s DS40FS dehumidifier. Sounds like a good model.

    After speaking to a Meaco specialist today, they suggested I go for this (compressor) model:

    http://www.meaco.com/dehumidifier/home-dehumidifiers/meaco-20l-low-energy-dehumidifierair-purifier-is-a-which-best-buy

    "Sawdust? I think you'll find that's man-glitter."

    #622785
    Mark68
    Participant

    When you get conflicting advice from Meaco (dehumidifier) specialists, you know this isn’t going to be easy.

    This is what I was told by one Meaco specialist (who told me to get the Desiccant model):

    Compressor units work best in temperatures 16 degrees and above, if your shed is not going to be around that temperature then these types of units will not be helpful to you as they will always be in defrost mode.

    Desiccant units can work in temperatures down to 1 degree – we normally suggest customers purchase these units for garages, sheds, boats etc. These units also act as heaters and give out air 11-12 degrees warmer than the air taken in.

    But then, another specialist recently told me to get the Compressor unit.

    "Sawdust? I think you'll find that's man-glitter."

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