drilling a hole in a bow saw blade

This topic contains 14 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  David Perrott 3 years, 7 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #133482

    David Perrott
    Participant

    Anyone have a tips about drilling the hole in the bow saw blade? I bought one of the milwaukee 10/14 tpi blades P.S. blogged about but can’t get a hole drilled in it. Is a carbide drill bit needed?

    #133491

    ejtrent
    Participant

    Hey buddy, yeah they are probably hardened steel – whether thats to a normal hardness or super duper hard who knows! Carbide tipped masonary bits on a slow speed with oil works in this situation – or if you dont have access to these you could always try softening the steel by annealing it a little (or attempting to) Heat where you want to drill to a solid glow then allow to dry in air, this could soften it for sure!

    Elliott

    #133494

    David Perrott
    Participant

    Thanks. Thought about heating it up…or I guess by the carbide tip blade. Could finish it if I can get a hole drilled in it!

    #133496

    Frank Joseph
    Member

    .? I drilled it with no problems punched it put a drop of oil on it and drilled it.

    In South Jersey the good part of New Jersey, USA.

    #133497

    David Perrott
    Participant

    Carbide tip? Had a friend try since I din’t have a drill bit.

    #133498

    roofusson
    Participant

    to anneal / soften the metal where you want the hole to be. instead of heating a strip of steel. You can get a old drill bit. insert it up side down. Then just heat the area desired. Good luck Peter

    #133499

    undergroundhunter
    Participant

    Why not just punch the hole with a punch over a piece of steel with an appropriate size hole? That what I did.

    Matt

    #133500

    Scott Chensoda
    Participant

    It’s a cobalt bit you need for drilling hardened metal David not carbide. Carbide bits are solely for drilling masonry or concrete. If you are given the choice then go for the the harder bit. 5% cobalt = M35 and 8% cobalt = M42. When drilling hardened metal it is best to create an indent on your mark with a centre punch first to prevent the bit from sliding on initial take-up. Then as Frank suggested add a drop of oil, set your drill to Low-speed and away you go.

    Oh, one important thing. Clamp the blade otherwise you could end up with a wildly spinning blade when the bit breaks through and it can bite big time.

    #133504

    David Perrott
    Participant

    I will try the cobalt bit.

    #133506

    steveh
    Participant

    I used the same blade in the bow saw that I made. I just made a mark with a center punch and drilled with a regular twist bit. I did use a corded drill and clamped to a wooden backer block.

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 7 months ago by  steveh.
    #133519

    David Perrott
    Participant

    Colbalt bit, drop of oil, and bam…done. Thats what I get for asking a friend to drill it, since I didn’t have a drill bit!

    #133525

    djm39
    Participant

    I built my saw on Monday and bought a blade yesterday (Milwaukee 14TPI band saw blade), but wound up ruining it. I heated the ends, let them cool, and tried to drill. One side worked fine, but the other wouldn’t drill. It wound up cracking from the pressure of the drill press. Today I bought another blade and tried again – with a new drill bit. Heated the end, put it in place and used a hammer and a screw to mark the spot. The bit cut the hole, but then the surrounding area fractured.

    So I broke off the end and tried with an unheated spot. The screw actually punched a hole and then I was able to drill it. Snapped the other side to length and did the same to it. Since I got the saw assembled I’ve spent a couple of hours cutting up pieces of scrap wood 🙂

    #133526

    David Perrott
    Participant

    I drilled mine and put it together. One of my tenons is a bit off and the blade has a bit of a bend to it at one end. It doesn’t work too well. Ugh. Now I need to try to adjust it or start again.

    #133527

    djm39
    Participant

    Yeah, my tenons are a bit off too. The saw seems to work ok – I can’t tell if the problems are with my saw or with my sawing 🙂

    #133529

    David Perrott
    Participant

    Actually I thought my saw kerf may be a bit off. There was a slight curve in the blade. It seems less now. Maybe the blade had a bit of a bend and it is lessening. The thing is hard to start though. Will take a bit to get used to it!

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.