Durability difference between Eze-lap and DMT?

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  • #16813
    John Purser
    Participant

    Has anyone else used both DMT and Eze-lap stones and noticed a difference in the durability and cutting speed between them?

    I ordered my plates from Amazon back in February 2013 and as I had a backlog of sharpening to do by then I’ve put some miles on them. And I’ve come to the conclusion since then that the Eze-lap FAR outlast the DMT stones.

    I’ve got a coarse and extra fine DMT and a fine Eze-lap, all 3X8. The Eze-lap stone looks and feels new while both of the DMT stones have a little rust and some discolored areas. Also the “fine” Eze-Lap stone feels much coarser than the “coarse” DMT stone does now. I put that down to a quirk of manufacturing until yesterday when I was having trouble getting plane iron sharp. Just to see what would happen, I set the coarse stone aside and switched to my “fine” stone. The fine stone quickly cut down to the edge and gave me a burr.

    I use a honing guide on the coarse stone to set the angle and then follow up using Paul’s by hand method across all three stones. My results when I go by hand for the whole process are just too variable for me right now. So this was comparing an iron held in a honing guide on both stones so the angle presented was consistent. I can’t see any other explanation other than the fine stone cut faster.

    I’m sure the coarse stone has seen heavier use but if I really need to reshape a blade I do it on sandpaper stuck to a tile first so I don’t think I’ve been abusive to that coarse stone.

    I’ve always bought DMT stones before and prefer their thicker profile. But I can’t deny what I’m seeing happen to the steel. Has anyone else used both stones and noticed a difference?

    John

    John Purser
    Hubert, NC

    #16815
    Charles Cleland
    Participant

    John, I don’t know this for fact as I haven’t had any DMT stones, but it might be that the coarser stones just wear faster. I have all EZE laps, and the coarse stones have worn faster than the finer ones. We might be able to compare sometime, as I am only 20 Miles or so from Tacoma.

    Washington State, USA
    My own humble blog:
    http://toolsofourfathers.wordpress.com/

    #16816
    John Purser
    Participant

    Andy,

    You might have a point about the coarser stones wearing faster. Still, I’ll stick to Eze-lap stones from now on even if they do cost a bit more.

    I found a few other people who had tried both and of those who had a preference as a result (not all did) most seemed to prefer the Eze-laps.

    I have “worn out” diamond stones before but it took years. They were the DMT stones with a ceramic base with a steel plate attached to the top, not the solid steel base ones I’m using now.

    John

    John Purser
    Hubert, NC

    #16817
    jgust747
    Participant

    The grit is just the average grit. You will have both lager and smaller diamonds when the plate is new, as it wears down the diamonds will become more uniform.

    DTM and EZE-Lap are using different types diamonds, the DTM diamonds fracture a bit easier, this is both god and bad as they keep sharp this way but also become more uniform faster.

    Dallas, Texas

    #16829

    What do you gents use for a lubricant on the diamond plates? I just bought the EzeLap plates and am using mineral oil as the lube?

    #16832
    Charles Cleland
    Participant

    I like the window cleaner Paul suggests. I bought a bottle of generic windex and its lasted me almost a year. Has to be wiped off at the end of the session or the leftover swarf from the blade rusts on top of the plate, but even if that happens it comes right off the next time you use the plate.

    Washington State, USA
    My own humble blog:
    http://toolsofourfathers.wordpress.com/

    #16835
    John Purser
    Participant

    I use window cleaner as well though I went to the cheap bargain brand stuff. And I keep a bucket of water beside me. When the swarf gets too thick and at the end of the session I wash the plates off with water and rubbing it with my hand.

    John Purser
    Hubert, NC

    #16836
    Steve Follis
    Participant

    I used window cleaner with my EZE-LAP stones at first, but I was seeing rust in the stones, so I switched to WD-40, it works well for me. I also made the mistake of initally trying to clean them with a fiber-type cleaning cloth, the fibers shreaded and ended up all through the stones, expecially the coarser ones. I had to dry them out thoroughly and use Duct Tape to get the fibers out. Otherwise I a still satisfied with the stones. I have never used the DMT plates, so I can’t compare.

    Memphis, Tennessee

    #16840

    I’m using regular windshield washer fluid, it works fine for me, no rust and clean plates very well. I have DMT 220 as coarse and EZE-LAP following 600 and 1200. 220 from DMT feels as smooth as 600 on touch, but it’s working. I read good reviews about Atoma plates, they more expensive. I know Paul don’t recommend water stones ( I bought them previously ) I have some too. I like to use them for knife sharpening . Yes I know you need to flatten them. If you have chance to buy Naniwa Super Stone 5,000 grit stone on sale you gonna like it. Just as the stone between 1200 and stropping, again it just my personal opinion I might be wrong and it’s no need for that, but that stone polished almost any steel like crazy.

    Toronto, Canada

    #16845
    jgust747
    Participant

    I used to use window cleaner and also got some rust spots Then I talked to Paul when he was here for the wood show, he was using glass cleaner. I went to the dollar store and got a bottle, no more rust. 🙂

    I think the glass cleaner has some ammonia or something in it that makes it not rust the iron filings on the plates.

    Dallas, Texas

    #16846
    Mark Armstrong
    Participant

    I have a couple of Trend diamond plate one is a extra course 220 grit the other is a double side plate 600 and a 1000 grit I also have an eze-lap superfine 1200. On the Trend plates you are ment to use Trend lapping fluid it is a very fine oil. It is rather expensive. So I use some sort of cleaner out of a spray bottle still some times see small rust spots. So I dry off each time I use this prevents rust spots.

    Dagenham, Essex, England

    #16854
    robinhc
    Participant

    and then follow up using Paul’s by hand method across all three stones. My results when I go by hand for the whole process are just too variable for me

    I had the same experience, and then remembers something from a golf lesson I took several years ago. The lesson was about how important the grip was. When sharpening by hand, I alway removed more metal from one side than the other. I realized that my right wrist was “subconsciously” trying to turn in that direction. So I changed my grip (A LOT) in that direction and … began removing more from the OTHER side of the edge. I thought I was “on to something” as they say. I continued to experiment until I found the “sweet-stop” of my grip.

    Anyway … that’s my story and I am sticking to it.

    Robin ... Richmond, Virginia, USA

    #16855
    robinhc
    Participant

    What do you gents use for a lubricant on the diamond plates?

    I use (1) mostly Windex original glass cleaner, (2) some WD-40 liquid (not the aerosol spray – comes in a big rectangular can – used in a plastic trigger pump spray bottle), and (3) sometimes 3-in-1 oil.

    I clean plates by dabbing with paper towel.

    Robin ... Richmond, Virginia, USA

    #16857
    Scott
    Participant

    I also use windshield fluid. I picked up a smallish plastic pump bottle from the box store. I definitely see rust spots, but that is because I am not so diligent about wiping (or rinsing) all the swarf off the plate after each use.

    I got tired of spritzing with a regular spray bottle, so I bought a “RL Flo-Max” pump sprayer from the box store for around $7. Holds 4 pints and I only have to pump (pressurize) the bottle once every week or so. Works great.

    -Scott Los Angeles

    #16905
    Paul Sellers
    Keymaster

    I think that diamond lapping fluid works quite well, but not as well as glass cleaner from the Dollar store or the Pound stretcher. a Dollar or a Pound, what’s the difference? About 52 cents. Lapping fluid was supposedly designed for use with diamonds, but I think that’s about the same as snake oil in cowboy country in the 1800’s. At $10 a pop for a little squirt bottle I think even the most refined of diamonds can live just fine with ordinary common glass cleaner. Also, remember that diamond lapping fluids produced by some sales outfits are petrochemical based. Not good for the hands or internal organs.

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