Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 43 total)
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  • #205082
    Mark68
    Participant

    On page 292 of Paul’s book (Essential Woodworking Hand Tools) Paul talks about how to change the pitch of the teeth of a saw to make it more or less aggressive in its cut.

    For example “If the front pitch of the tooth is steep, that is, near to vertical, then the teeth will cut aggressively – often too aggressively. By altering this to a lesser pitch, we create a less aggressive saw cut.

    Also “We can lessen the pitch much more than this…

    I don’t understand. I realise we can sharpen the saw’s teeth with a saw file, but those teeth are pretty hard I’d have thought. So how can we actually change the pitch of the teeth?

    I should add I’m talking about rip cut saws in case that makes a difference.

    "Sawdust? I think you'll find that's man-glitter."

    • This topic was modified 3 years, 4 months ago by Mark68.
    • This topic was modified 3 years, 4 months ago by Mark68.
    • This topic was modified 3 years, 4 months ago by Mark68.
    #211951
    Hugo Notti
    Participant

    We do it the same way, that we sharpen the teeth: remove material with a file.

    You should watch the video about cutting new teeth into a worn out sawblade.

    Dieter

    #212795
    david o’sullivan
    Participant

    you can change the pitch by rotating the file

    "we can learn what to do, by doing" Aristotle

    #212843
    deanbecker
    Participant

    It is hard to see but the file rotates. At the front the file is flat across the top then as you go back the file rotates which when you cut the tooth the point of the tooth points more to the front.
    This makes the tooth grab harder. And is where you get the pitch difference

    #213192
    Mark68
    Participant

    Still not getting it sorry :/

    I’ve watched the video too

    "Sawdust? I think you'll find that's man-glitter."

    #219213
    david o’sullivan
    Participant

    the file has 6 sides.. 3 large faces and 3 small faces at the corners =6
    with the file in the gullet of the saw and you are looking down you should have one of the large faces horizontal and facing the sky with 2 small faces pointing left and right if you file like this is a negative rake OR (a less aggressive rake). you should file the first inch or so of teeth like this .now rotate the file slightly to the left the large face you were looking at for the first inch is now sloping to the left . the face on the right of the file should be vertical or 90 degrees. this increases the pith dramatically and gives an aggressive rake file the rest of the saw moving towards the handle like this .

    hope this helps
    david

    "we can learn what to do, by doing" Aristotle

    #224114
    deanbecker
    Participant

    When You watch the video concentrate on the top of the file. Watch how it goes from flat on top to having one of the points on top.
    The file rotates as you move to the back.

    #232282
    Mark68
    Participant

    So, can we actually change the shape of the saw’s teeth? I mean, literally change their shape?

    "Sawdust? I think you'll find that's man-glitter."

    #265184
    Derek Long
    Participant

    Yep, you can actually change the shape of the teeth with a saw file. Very easily, in fact.

    Derek Long
    Denver, Colorado

    #268473
    Mark68
    Participant

    Yep, you can actually change the shape of the teeth with a saw file. Very easily, in fact.

    Yep, you can actually change the shape of the teeth with a saw file. Very easily, in fact.

    That’s the part that was throwing me, I never knew you could

    Thanks all

    "Sawdust? I think you'll find that's man-glitter."

    #550295
    Mark68
    Participant

    I didn’t want to start another thread and clog things up.

    I recently bought two Spear & Jackson saws, 26″. One for rip, the other for cross cutting. One of them has a bit of a rattle in the handle. I informed the supplier and they sent me a replacement, no questions asked. I used that the other day – and now the handle is rattling :/

    I haven’t even tried the other saw I bought, but I’m not hopeful given my experience with the other two saws.

    Trouble is, the saws are riveted so I’m not sure how to fix the rattling or even if it can be done.

    Any advice?

    "Sawdust? I think you'll find that's man-glitter."

    #550297
    Ecky H
    Participant

    Hello Mark,

    the cheapest way is to “tighten” the rivets: put one rivet after the other between the jaws of a (the bigger the better) metal vice an put pressure on.
    That worked for me.

    Edit: Of course to put the head of the rivet on an anvil and a whack with a hammer will do it as well.

    E.

    Veni, vidi, serravi.

    Münster, Germany

    #550299
    Andrew Sinclair
    Participant

    Mark, elsewhere PS recommends solving this specific issue by clamping a hammer face-up in the vice, as an anvil. Place the rivet on the hammer face and tap the other end of the rivet with a second hammer. Note “tap” not “whack” 😉

    #550300
    Ecky H
    Participant

    Note “tap” not “whack” 😉

    Thanks for clarification – didn’t know until yet that “to whack” is much nearer to “to wallop” than “to tap” is to “to knock”.

    E.

    Veni, vidi, serravi.

    Münster, Germany

    #550303
    harry wheeler
    Participant

    You’re skipping a couple. The sequence is supposed to go bump, tap, knock, wack, wallop, pound and bash. Be careful with bash – that one can make a mess!

    Harry

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