From Ash to Clash

  • Creator
    Topic
  • #56240
    John MeaneyJohn Meaney
    Participant

    Interesting video on selecting and farming Ash trees for forty years to use the buttress root area for a sport tool requiring a specific grain. Having played this game years ago the selection of the hurley is crucial to each individual person.

    Hope you enjoy!

    John Meaney

    Anything I make will be better next time.

Viewing 8 replies - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
  • Author
    Replies
  • #56272
    David GillDavid Gill
    Participant

    @daveg

    John I did enjoy, It was a fascinating video
    Thanks for sharing

    Wigan, Lancs. England :

    #56280
    sidreilleysidreilley
    Participant

    @sidreilley

    Interesting video, especially liked the details on how they farm the ash trees to get the best raw material. I must admit that I’d never even heard of the game though.

    Cheers

    #56321
    Denise GaulDeniseG
    Participant

    @deniseg

    Understanding the characteristics of wood must be a life long pursuit. I had no idea basket lath could be rendered in this manner.

    And Here’s a link to Peter’s blog post about the process.

    http://pfollansbee.wordpress.com

    i'd prefer to make it myself

    #56346
    Greg MerrittGreg Merritt
    Participant

    @gman3555

    John that is a really good video. I’m especially struck by the passion that is exhibited towards the production of these hurley sticks. Thanks for sharing this.

    http://hillbillydaiku.com

    #56350
    David GillDavid Gill
    Participant

    @daveg

    Denise
    Another interesting worth watching video I bet that process goes back 1000’s of years
    Thanks for posting

    Wigan, Lancs. England :

    #56360
    John MeaneyJohn Meaney
    Participant

    @johnmeaney

    From Ash to Bash!

    I never you could do that with Ash but it makes perfect sense. The statement using a woods weakness as its strength defines Ash. Ash has been used for thousands of years as it could be easily steam shaped, straight grained, etc.
    Have a look at these “Baidin” or Boat Builders chairs http://brendanlawlessfurniture.com/ I expect these would have only three legs originally and Brendans vimeo http://vimeo.com/75565419 shows the laths being shaped 03:55.

    Would love to make these!

    Anything I make will be better next time.

    #56438
    David GillDavid Gill
    Participant

    @daveg

    Nice video John, why are they called Boat builders Chairs? Do they look like boats , were used by boat builders or were they built by boat builders.

    Thanks for posting

    Wigan, Lancs. England :

    #56507
    John MeaneyJohn Meaney
    Participant

    @johnmeaney

    I think the original came from a chair found in a boat builders yard and dated to early 1800’s and they do look like a boat. The chair design seems earlier though as an article from 1800’s describe http://www.libraryireland.com/articles/ancientirishchair/index.php They have their own charm, very comfortable and practical for uneven ground. There is an enigma about three legged chairs but they were very common around our west coast where timber was scarce and valued. http://www.museum.ie/en/list/documentationdiscoveries.aspx?article=381729cd-7a6f-4ba1-8e7b-245723c4ca4b

    Maybe they were just conveniently made from scraps, cutoffs or reclaimed planks.

    There was a wonderful series of videos taken in the 70’s and 80’s in Ireland to record the last of the traditional crafts simply called “Hands” which kind of describes the difference between a boat builder and a chair maker. I had better start another thread.

    Anything I make will be better next time.

Viewing 8 replies - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)

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