Hand Brace ratchet to handle thread

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    Topic
  • #553599
    OrestisOrestis
    Participant

    Hi all,
    i recently aquired a used brace and bit, the problem is that the whole ratchet/shell assembly is screwed on to the handle (not sure if all braces are made like that) and so under use it tends to unscrew itself, thus prohibiting square drilling.I hope the photos are self explanatory of the problem. Is there a way to fix this?

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Viewing 14 replies - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)
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  • #553608
    Glenn DubeGlenn Dube
    Participant

    @javelin

    looks like a decent brace otherwise. I think those threads are to far gone to save. I’d weld it up maybe it was made for interchangeable chucks?

    #553609
    OrestisOrestis
    Participant

    @orestis

    Thanks Glenn,Yes that is what i thought too, but still i don’t understand how is the chuck supposed to stay in place during use. Welding would be an option if i knew how to do it😄. Maybe superglue would work?

    #553619
    markhmarkh
    Participant

    @markh

    Have a look more closely at the ring around the socket where the handle thread goes into the shell. Is that a fracture surface there? In that case, part of the casting (where the ring selector is located) might be missing (fractured) thus taking part of the female thread away and making it difficult to tighten the handle sufficiently. If not, is there any indication of the manufacturers identity? Was it British made or US made – this will give a better idea of what the thread might be.

    My problem with understanding what has happened here is that the normal rotational action of the brace should not cause that handle thread to rotate. The rotation should occur about the joint below the selector ring – same axis as through the chuck. Perhaps that joint is frozen. Perhaps need some clearer pictures. Try a camera with a macro facility.

    Cheers
    Mark

    #553627
    OrestisOrestis
    Participant

    @orestis

    Hello Mark
    Unfortunately i can’t find any signs as to where it was made. I did find however a small hole on the female thread (photo attached), maybe that was supposed to be for a bearing ball or a pin?
    Cheers

    Attachments:
    #553660
    markhmarkh
    Participant

    @markh

    Yes, but how was that hole drilled when the brace was being manufactured? There must be an entrance hole either below the visible hole, or, more likely, diagonally opposite the visible hole. Is there a shear pin, or the remains of one in the threaded part of the handle (the bow)?

    Or is there a fracture surface on the end of the male thread?

    You might also have a look at Brit’s page on Lumberjocks – The Humble Brace – A Beginners Guide to Restoring Owning and Using Part 2 – he renovates a brace with a similar type of mechanism, although he didn’t have to dis-assemble that part of the brace. It will give you some photos of what parts should be there. Look down the bottom of that particular page. I have attached a link but I’m not sure that links will go through the system. I’ll try anyway.
    http://lumberjocks.com/Brit/blog/25110
    If you can get access to a copy of Aldren Watson’s book – “Hand Tools – Their Ways and Workings” There are some useful sketches on pages 46-49 of this kind of brace mechanism but sadly not the threaded attachment of the bow to the cam ring. The pin referred to above as a shear pin is called the “stop pin” in Watson’s book.
    Cheers
    Mark

    #553667
    Glenn DubeGlenn Dube
    Participant

    @javelin

    Ahh I think now see now. That hole you point out is it possible it was drilled through the hole part and the outside and the other side is hiding the ends of the pin? Assemblies like that are usually pinned in assembly. And if they do it right the pin and the hole are closely matched and blended so you cant even see them unless something moves. So I look back at your other pictures and the threaded stub looks too short. I think it may have broken off where the pin went through and they took the broken piece out and simply tried to thread it in further. You might measure to see if the centre of where the bit goes is colinera with the centre fo the top handle pad when assembled. I think they are supposed to be. And if they are not then using the brace properly may be a problem

    #553668
    Glenn DubeGlenn Dube
    Participant

    @javelin

    eek!.. wish I could edit that. If its confusing I’ll re write it

    #553676
    OrestisOrestis
    Participant

    @orestis

    Mark, I think i found the shear pin ( or its remains) in the threaded part of the handle. Glenn, not sure i understand what you wrote.

    Attachments:
    #553681
    markhmarkh
    Participant

    @markh

    Thanks for that photo which explains what has happened. It would be possible to repair – however it would take a fair bit of effort and what facilities you have available to you.

    What you do next depends upon how adept you are at drilling the pin out of the hole (or trying to use a pin punch to tap it out) and then using a tap and die set to clean up the male and female threads. Not sure what the actual thread type would be but it would, in all probability, be one of the common ones for the size of the bow. After correcting the threads, you would have to get another pin, correct to size and fix it in place with a small amount of protrusion so that it can act as the stop pin for the cam ring (see Watson reference from above – page 48). That would fix the brace – but would it be worth your time? Possibly not. Braces are not expensive tools and a quality secondhand replacement 10inch brace might cost $50 from a reputable source (not eBay!).
    I hope that this helps.
    Cheers
    Mark

    #553684
    OrestisOrestis
    Participant

    @orestis

    Well i think all that is beyond my skills and tools. Would epoxy or superglue fix the handle into the cam?
    Thanks a lot for your help.
    Cheers

    #553697
    markhmarkh
    Participant

    @markh

    No. Neither epoxy nor cyano-acrylate glues will work. Not with steel.

    #553699
    EdEd
    Participant

    @ed

    JB Kwik Weld can be used on metal. I cannot say if it will be adequate here.

    #553703
    OrestisOrestis
    Participant

    @orestis

    Thank you all for your replies.

    Cheers

    #553720
    Dave RingDave Ring
    Participant

    @davering

    I’d try to knock out the pieces of the pin with an appropriately sized punch before anything else.

    Dave

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