How fine exactly is the "Super Fine" EZE-Lap diamond stone?

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Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)
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  • #65381
    J_SAMa
    Participant

    Hi,

    I recently purchased a Super Fine EZE-Lap to replace a generic brand, double sided plate I’d been using. Now I’m aware that diamond stones do start out rough and progressively reveal their true grit size, but it’s been almost two weeks of heavy use and the scratch pattern it leaves is still about as rough as my well-worn (2 year-old) Coarse place, which is also EZE-Lap.
    I remember the initial roughness on both the Coarse EZE-Lap and the cheapo wore off within couple days of use. So is it common for the Super Fine EZE-Lap to retain its roughness this long?
    And may I ask that someone who has a well-worn EZE-Lap upload a picture of the scratch pattern it leaves so I have something to compare with?

    Thank you,

    Sam

    #78749
    BrianJ
    Participant

    Not much to offer for reply, I have the dmt stones, and all three are noticeably different.

    Ontario, Canada

    #80770
    J_SAMa
    Participant

    Not much to offer for reply, I have the dmt stones, and all three are noticeably different.

    Hi, thanks for your reply. Here I’ve uploaded pictures of the scratch pattern left by the diamond plate in question, how does it compare to your DMT’s equivalent?

    #80944
    BrianJ
    Participant

    On the backs of my chisels I work on the granite/ paper as I like to keep my stones for the beveled edged blades, but I will work on the 1000 for a bit stone as well. What grits are you progressing through? Also paul did a YouTube video on flattening/ sharpening I sometimes go back to as a refresher.

    Ontario, Canada

    #81083
    J_SAMa
    Participant

    On the backs of my chisels I work on the granite/ paper as I like to keep my stones for the beveled edged blades, but I will work on the 1000 for a bit stone as well. What grits are you progressing through? Also paul did a YouTube video on flattening/ sharpening I sometimes go back to as a refresher.

    Hi, its coarse-fine-super fine (the plate in question). The fine actually leaves an even finer scratch pattern than the super fine hence my question…

    #118489
    Ben Vreeland
    Participant

    That seems very course. You should contact the company. My DMT 325 leave a more scratch free finish then that.

    #118495
    Maurice Villari
    Participant

    I have the Medium, Fine and Super Fine from EZE-Lap and none of them leaves that sort of rough scratch pattern. The Fine is 800 grit and the Super Fine is 1200 grit.
    I would ask EZE-Lap for a replacement.
    I have had them for over a year and I am very happy with them as they are guaranteed flat unlike the other brands including DMT.

    #121563
    Ed
    Participant

    I asked EZ-lap in November of 2012 and was told:

    SF – 1200 grit = 15 to 20 microns
    F – 600 grit = 30 to 35 microns
    M – 400 grit = 40 to 45 microns
    C – 250 grit = 50 to 55 microns
    XC – 150 grit = 60 to 65 microns

    I’m not sure how accurate these are, but that is what they said. My 220 micron DMT feels *much* coarser than the C EZE-lap. To be honest, I’m not sure if that is a coarseness difference or difference in the amount of abrasive on the plate, DMT vs. EZE lap.

    Hope that helps.

    #121564
    dwaugh
    Participant

    One thing to keep in mind with “grits” is that there are different standards. It looks like the the grit sizes that Ed got from EZ-lap are FEPA (Europe) not ANSI “grits” USA. This link has a chart http://www.fine-tools.com/G10019.htm
    I use lots of abrasive papers at work and always forget which standards which companies use, it can get confusing.

    #121570
    Ed
    Participant

    Luckily, microns are always microns. You’re right- I shouldn’t have typed an “=” sign between the grit number and size in microns since it depends on the grit system. Thanks for catching that.

    #121591
    J_SAMa
    Participant

    Hi,
    Just to let you guys know, it feels much finer now. Still getting about the same scratch pattern but the edge quality has improved.

    #140497
    jeffpolaski
    Participant

    Dwaugh has a very good point. Each producer has its own standards. DMT “Superfine” is supposed to be 1200 grit, but they now have newer stones that go to 4000 and 8000.
    Rather than look at “grit” ratings that we have little control over, I’ve been watching Mr. Sellers’ technique, how he uses the stone, and perhaps much more importantly, how he uses stropping after sharpening on whatever stones he uses. I’ve found that good stropping can make a sharpened edge much better, or even much worse.
    There’s a point at which sharpening stops being a burden and starts being something nice to do. I’m more relaxed these days.

    #143402
    Larry Geib
    Participant

    I have DMT stones ( except 1 EZlap. it is 600 grit, which fits nicely in the DMT range.) DMT’s Extra fine is 1200 mesh (9 micron, according to DMT.)

    ezLap’s Superfine is about 1200 grit, according to Paul. They don’t seem to list micron size.
    He says they aren’t much different, except in the very coarse grits. There he says the EZlap ones are a bit coarser. expect them to be to be roughly, but not exactly the same otherwise.

    I haven’t found mixing the brands makes a lot of difference.

    I did just buy a DMT extra EXTRA fine, which is listed as 8000 mesh (3 microns) which I use only on my fine surfacing planes. To tell the truth, it’s not much different than a careful honing.

    At least I haven’t seen much performance difference. Maybe when it breaks in…

    #143423
    jeffpolaski
    Participant

    And I have the 4000 grit DMT, then I use the 8000 DMT, and unless Paul Sellers is standing over me, I really don’t have much idea if it does any more that the “Superfine 1200”. I have a feeling that I’m not stropping with the vigor that Mr. Sellers strops. Maybe the difference is there.
    So, there’s nothing for it but to keep trying, and if the edge doesn’t nick my thumbnail, I’ve got a less-than-sharp blade, and I have to try again, and try to emulate what I see Paul Sellers doing. I have to pay attention.
    My carving knives are very sharp, using the same grits in DMY folding hand stones and green strop compound. But I’ve been sharpening knives in my hands all my life, maybe as long as Paul Sellers.
    There’s maybe a difference in using bench stones and strops and I’ll need another 50 years to discover it.
    Keep trying, you’ve got the right gear, I believe, and pay attention.

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