How to secure the back of a picture frame?

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  • #138174
    Joe Kaiser
    Participant

    How do you secure the cardboard backing to a picture frame? I’m sure it is something simple, but I’m not sure how to go about it.

    Seattle, WA

    #138175
    Richard Senior
    Participant

    It is usually sealed with a brown paper tape. Search for “framers tape” or “framing tape”.

    Some commercial frames have small metal tabs that fold over the backing material but I just checked the back of some photographs I had framed professionally about 15 years ago and they are just framing tape (and it is still secure).

    #138182
    David R.
    Participant

    For something larger you could use the same technique Paul uses on the mirror, i.e. turn buttons (https://woodworkingmasterclasses.com/2016/06/carved-mirror-frame-episode-6/).

    For a small frame, I have used simple nails which I flattened with a hammer. Not sure how conventional that is, but it works. Didn’t take a picture before giving it away, sorry.

    David

    from Germany

    #138186
    Joe Kaiser
    Participant

    Thanks David, I’ll give that a try.

    Seattle, WA

    #138228
    Peter George
    Participant

    You can use either brads or glazier points to secure the work into the frame. I have a point gun that I use, however I do a lot of picture framing, so the expense is worth it. You can get glazier points that you push in with a screwdriver or putty knife.

    Peter in
    Biggar SK
    "New York is big, but this is Biggar"

    #138229
    Joe Kaiser
    Participant

    I ended up using glazier points and a screw drive thanks 🙂

    Seattle, WA

    #141735
    jeffpolaski
    Participant

    If you use any kind or paper or cardboard backing, and professionals are known to do that so there is a good seal all around, make sure that it is acid free, especially if you value the object being framed. I have framed black and white photographs, and have used acid-free tape, also.
    Acid is part of the photograph development process, so photos are especially sensitive over time. This really goes for anything in a frame or even photo albums. It’s a bit more expensive, but your great-grandchildren won’t have to squint to figure out what is behind the glass.

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