Kitchen cabinets (“hutch”) and a pause from white oak

Welcome! Forums General Woodworking Discussions Projects Kitchen cabinets (“hutch”) and a pause from white oak

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #726142
    Sven-Olof Jansson
    Participant

    A set of three kitchen cabinets, made with the intent of not exposing end grain, and to have a “minimalistic” appearance.

    Fully concealed mitred dovetails joining the upper surface to the sides of the lower chest of drawers. Otherwise I used half concealed dovetails. The front rails of the drawer dividers are jointed to the cabinet sides by retracted stopped sliding dovetails. In addition to provide much appreciated improved stability to the carcasses, the drawer fronts could overlap them while still being inset. That also opened a Pandora’s box of issues around fitting the drawers with regard to the lower edge of an upper drawer front, to the upper edge of the drawer beneath.

    As every cubic mm counts in this small croft kitchen, there are drawers in the plinth as well.

    Three kitchen cabinets on a plinth

    By governmental decree it was oak aut nihil. Options were limited to what the whole seller had to offer, after industry customers had taken theirs; leaving me with white oak (Quercus Alba) of often prominent and beautifil figure, but also challenging grain and a density of around 0.9. Tangential silicate rich late wood took a toll on both me and plane blades. So, until my skills have improved significantly, I will stick to less demanding stuff.

    Videos by Mr. D. Charlesworth were utterly helpful in making the concealed mitred dovetail joints. It required quite the number of guides and jiggs, but every deviation from canon brought trouble. The mitre lines could of course have been better, but at a length of 18″, I’m OK with them.

    Dry fit concealed mitred dovetails

    Left mitre line

    Sven-Olof Jansson
    London, UK; Boston, MA

    #726194
    robdavies
    Participant

    Very nice work Sven.
    Would you recommend David Charlesworth’s books and DVD’s as a learning resource? I’ve seen lots of people mention him but I’ve not seen any of his instructional material.

    #726209
    Sven-Olof Jansson
    Participant

    Many thanks Rob!

    I have bought the online videos that Lie-Nielsen Toolworks offer, and I do recommend them with some minor/insignificant caveats.

    The main one might be that Mr. Charlesworth, in the videos I’ve watched, teaches methods, not projects. A minor caveat might be that his work pieces generally are of a very high quality, but as said, it is about techniques.

    All in all: I’ve learned loads.

    Sven-Olof Jansson
    London, UK; Boston, MA

    #726212
    Matt Sims
    Participant

    Well done Sven!

    #726225
    robdavies
    Participant

    Thanks Sven, very useful.
    I think I’m going to treat myself.
    All the best, Rob

    #726448
    Sven-Olof Jansson
    Participant

    Thanks Matt!

    Sven-Olof Jansson
    London, UK; Boston, MA

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.