Skip to content

longevity of coarse EZE lap diamond plate

Welcome! Forums General Woodworking Discussions Tools and Tool Maintenance/Restoration longevity of coarse EZE lap diamond plate

Tagged: 

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 44 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #123866
    Chris Bunney
    Participant

    Hi all,
    About six months ago I invested in a set of EZE lap diamond plates like Paul uses (coarse, fine and super-fine). They work great, but I noticed that the coarse plate quickly lost a lot of its “coarseness”.

    When I first used it, it very quickly removed material, but now it doesn’t seem as efficient. It almost feels like my fine plate removes material quicker. I’ve tried cleaning the plate with a brass wire brush.

    Its not that it doesn’t cut, its just that it doesn’t feel like it is cutting like a ” coarse” plate.

    Has anyone had similar experiences?

    Sorry for any typos – I’m writing this in a service station whilst waiting for roadside assistance after putting unleaded petrol in my diesel car…… D’uh.

    Chris - Exeter, UK

    #123867
    Nick18
    Participant

    Have you tried using a normal (office) eraser to clean the diamond stone? I like that method very much, afterwards I use a brass wire brush too. Make sure your stone is dry before doing the eraser method.

    And yes it’s normal for diamond stones to initially loose a bit of their coarseness fast but after that they stop degrading further in my experience.

    #123868
    Chris Bunney
    Participant

    Hi @nick18

    Have you tried using a normal (office) eraser to clean the diamond stone?

    I’ve not heard of using an eraser – I will give that a try! Thanks!

    Chris - Exeter, UK

    #123869
    John Meaney
    Participant

    Chris,

    My Eze-lap Coarse stone has completely lost its “coarseness” months ago – its more like a double-super extra fine now. I tried plastic erasers, vinegar and other sorts but nothing. I thought I just over used it and bought a new combination oilstone and a fine oilstone (old Grey/black) as I couldn’t justify buying another d-stone. Haven’t touched the d-stones so far but I haven’t had much woodwork time recently.

    I don’t want to disillusion anyone about not buying the d-stones but I am disappointed in the coarse.

    Regards,
    John Meaney

    Anything I make will be better next time.

    #123870
    James Savage
    Participant

    Hello Chris, I am having the same experience with the coarse EZE LAP stone, I haven’t used it an awful lot either. I am really struggling to flatten the backs of plane irons and chisels with it and have now resorted to using a coarse 80 grit sandpaper on glass to do the initial grinding before using the 600 grit and 1200 grit stone (which still work great).
    I’ve washed mine in warm soapy water then rinsed under a tap but it made no real difference.
    I’m a bit peeved as it’s the most expensive plate, I think I paid about £56 for mine.

    I hope you get your car sorted ok, very nearly done that myself.

    Jim - Derbyshire.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xqF49Zwmzs0

    #123883
    Frank Joseph
    Member

    I bought DMT about 18 months ago I use them every day and as of yet I see little change. The EZE paddles and smaller cards I use on honing my turning tools degrade in about 6 months or so of normal use. I have gone back to my oil stones for honing the scrapers before turning a berr.
    Frankj

    In South Jersey the good part of New Jersey, USA.

    #123895
    Eddy Flynn
    Participant

    i’d be interested to hear more on this as ive not bought my course stone yet they (eze lap) wouldn’t be the first company to change a product once it became popular for a lesser grade,although Pauls stones seem very smooth,they would be shooting themselves in the foot if they have changed them, has anyone thought to contact the company to complain as these are not cheap and i’m sure if they realise their stones are not getting the reviews they should on here i’m sure they will listen as this site must have brought them some good custom over the last couple of years or so.

    Eddy .. Liverpool, Merseyside, UK
    ,

    #123896
    Eddy Flynn
    Participant

    if anyone wants to get rid of a course stone that they think isn’t doing its job i’ll give it a good home lol

    Eddy .. Liverpool, Merseyside, UK
    ,

    #123897
    Chris Bunney
    Participant

    Hi @j1mmy and @johnmeaney.
    Sounds like you are having the same experience as me.
    Oddly, it’s only the coarse stone that has degraded. My fine and super-fine work well.
    It is very dissapointing as, like you say, the coarse is the more epensive one!
    I too have resorted to sand paper to flatten the back of my irons.

    I wonder if DMT are a better choice….

    Chris - Exeter, UK

    #123919
    johnsull
    Participant

    Hi,
    I’ve been using DMT diamond stones and have exactly the same issue with the coarse plate. Admittedly I have given it rough use, but my DMT stones are not yet a year old…
    john

    #123922
    James Savage
    Participant

    I bought mine near the end of September so I’ve only had them four months. I was expecting a couple of years use at least.

    Jim - Derbyshire.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xqF49Zwmzs0

    #123924
    John Meaney
    Participant

    I decided coarse diamond stones are not forever and there may be a common trend with coarse d-stones by DMT and EZElap wearing out based on previous discussions here https://woodworkingmasterclasses.com/discussions/topic/durability-difference-between-eze-lap-and-dmt/

    so I concluded I would always need to replace them.

    I use Aluminium Oxide abrasive sheets from my local motor factors which are sold for car restoration. They’re good and cheap and I use diluted 3-in-1 as lubricant as I thought the water based lubricants were rusting my plane soles and I think maybe I like the smell of oil.

    I have grown quiet fond of my oil-stones btw.

    Anything I make will be better next time.

    #123928
    davedev
    Participant

    This is an interesting thread. I have had the same problem with both my EZE Lap coarse stone and paddle I bought only last year. I have already replaced the paddle with a DMT but not the stone because of the cost. I raised this directly with Paul on a course last year and he claims his stones last for years. I will ask him to comment directly on this thread

    #123940
    Alien8
    Participant

    I too have had such a failure.

    Replaced the coarse stone with a new one and an extra coarse one for the heavy duty. I must admit that I did brutally abused my first coarse one when trying to change bevels on my plough plane set.

    Diego

    #123941
    Alien8
    Participant

    Can’t seem to edit my reply so here goes part ii

    When ordering my second set I noticed . I did use my plates dry and on quite hard chisels. I would imagine that pressing hardened steel on the coarse diamonds might fracture them and change effectively to a finer grit.

    Paul also mentioned in some of his wwmc videos that the grit of his plates might have changed to smaller particles.

    My old coarse plate now almost gives me a mirror finish…

    Hth Diego

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 44 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.