Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
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  • #134436
    trooper82
    Participant

    A few months back I had this idea for making a 5 point star. I wanted it to be wide enough to act as a small shelf. Designed it in my head. Made a small prototype (mistake as it was not to same scale as finished project) which seemed to confirm I could do what I wanted. Well I made the real thing and found I could not put the thing together without breaking it then gluing it back, which I did and worked wonderfully. The help I am looking for is a more accurate way to make the pieces. I drew it out on a piece of ply then made all pieces off one location (I bet this is the problem). I know to get angles to come out requires great accuracy. The pics show where the parts meet and the lack of perfection I was looking for.

    Any advice?

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    #134493
    Matt McGrane
    Participant

    I’m thinking that making all the pieces based on one of the drawn elements could lead to 5X the errors at the end if there is any error at all in the first one. Having said that, I don’t have a good suggestion for you. But for making the saw cuts or planing chamfers, perhaps you could rig some jigs to get the proper angles.

    Matt, Northern California - Started a blog in 2016: http://tinyshopww.blogspot.com/

    #134498
    trooper82
    Participant

    What I did was use protractor and knife…set the angle as close to angle as these old eye could get…but I agree the error would add up quick

    #134499
    Ed
    Participant

    Are those angled half-laps in the middle? Are you happy with those and the issue is the points of the star? Where did you need to break it, and why?

    #134576
    trooper82
    Participant

    @ed

    Yes they angled half lap joints. Same joints Paul uses in the assembly table. I am very happy with them. They are a fast easy joint to make. My concerns are the tips. If you look closely you can see each pics is made the same. One joint from the top, the other from the bottom. The last piece I split along the grain between the joints to be able to assemble, then repaired the split with glue.

    #134577
    Ed
    Participant

    This is just brainstorming, because I’ve never built anything like this, but….

    Was your approach to work out the math, layout your joints (including the half laps), cut it all, then assemble? If so, I’m wondering if it would work better to cut two sets of corners and use a piece of tape on each to hold the pieces. This gives you two V’s. Place one over the other in the star configuration and use what you actually have to mark the half laps. If the angles at the tips aren’t exactly right, the half laps will be laid out to match. This also gives you a chance of tuning the miters at the tips to get them to close how you like. The tape holds the tips closed and flush while you do your half-lap marking. I’m not quite sure how to get the third V into this, but you see the idea…rather than dead reckon everything, work your way around laying out the joints from what’s been cut so far.

    #138152
    Mary B
    Participant

    If you cut an angle through a piece of wood and then rotate one piece it will match. (Except for the saw kurf loss) I think. So maybe cut a number of the pieces from one long one.

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