Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)
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  • #663420
    Jez Downs
    Participant

    Hi, I have a lovely old wooden jointer I’ve been using. However, the handle is loose. I don’t want to put a nail or screw in it. How do I get it out to re-glue it?

    Thanks!

    Jez

    #663425
    Larry Geib
    Participant

    Hopefully, the handle will have been glued with a protein hide glue, if at all. Such glues are reversible with heat ( 140° F – 60°C or so) and some moisture. Hot ( not too hot, it kills the glue) water and a heat gun is usually enough.
    Sometimes you get lucky and just a piston fit was used.
    In that case, just a steady upward pull will work.

    And when you reglue, use hide glue again .

    #663471
    Jez Downs
    Participant

    Thanks. So, just pour some hot water on the joint and point a heat gun at it for a bit?

    Also, if it’s a rock-in fit, do I pull up the front or rear of the handle first?

    • This reply was modified 4 months, 4 weeks ago by Jez Downs.
    #663554
    Larry Geib
    Participant

    Yeah. You can warm the plane up first so the hot water doesn’t cool so fast. You are trying to get the old glue to 140°-145°F. Getting the whole plane that warm works. The water is to replace the original moisture.

    Be gentle.

    If it was a piston fit you just have to figure our which way the mortise was cut. Is there a screw towards the front of the tote? the rear is probably undercut like a dovetail.. you have to sort of rock it back in that case.

    Post a picture.

    • This reply was modified 4 months, 4 weeks ago by Larry Geib.
    #663619
    Roberto Fischer
    Participant

    Is there a nail in there already? If it’s rocking in place, the glue might have failed already and it’s only held in place by a previous crappy fix. I have two that were like that. I removed the nails and glued it back after adding a thin piece of wood to both sides and taking shavings off until I had a tight fit.

    Removing the nail or the handle can be tricky. I honestly don’t remember how I did it.

    #663866
    Jez Downs
    Participant

    No nail I can see. Is hide glue easy to come by?

    Plane has P. Everett on it. Don’t know if that would be a maker or an owner.

    Attachments:
    #663869
    Jez Downs
    Participant

    No nail I can see. Is hide glue easy to come by?

    Plane has P. Everett on it. Don’t know if that would be a maker or an owner.

    The cracks look worse than they are I think they are superficial.

    Attachments:
    #663896
    Larry Geib
    Participant

    Nice plane. Well worth fixing.

    In the USA some version of hide glue is available everywhere. Titebond makes it, and my local orange box store, Lowe’s, my local hardware store and lumber dealers and my local grocery store ( Fred Meyers) carry it.

    A little more expensive is Old Brown glue https://www.oldbrownglue.com/
    Developed by furniture conservator and restorer Patrick Edwards in San Diego..
    I consider this a somewhat better product . It works better if you warm it by letting it sit in hot tap water for a few minutes. This stuff can be bought at woodworking stores like Rockler and Woodcrafters, and online at Lee Valley, TFWW, Higland woodworking, and others.

    These are cold formulations, basically hide glue with urea added so it stays fluid at room temperatures.

    Then there are hot hide glue formulation. Glue flakes and water are mixed and left to congeal 24 hrs or so. To use, you heat the glue in a double boiler glue pot to 145° it sets up in a minute or to and you can make a good joint by rubbing the parts together for a minute or two- no clamps.
    One advantage of using flakes it that they stay viables or centuries. You can store the leftovers by pouring it out in a pie tin and letting it harden. To reuse, break it up and start over.

    The mixed stuf has a shelf life, basically a year.

    Cleanup with all these is hot water and a rag. It has the advantage that it doesn’t cause stain issues like PVA does. I use it for furniture in all joints but glued up tops and such. Then I use titebond II.

    You can make your own cold formulation by using the flakes and urea and/ or salt. Google it and Patrick has posts on how to mix it.

    And you can even buy dried gelatin from the grocery store. It’s basically the same proteins as in hide glue ( use hot).

    If you want a definitive answer on a stamp, at least post a picture of it. Otherwise it’s a guess.

    One way You can tell it a stamp is an owners or a maker stamp by the nature of the actual letters in the stamp. Owners mark are inset into the wood. Maker marks are an inset field with raise letters, often surrounded by a jagged border.. if you can’t decide which, post a picture. Below is a makers stamp for plane maker Caleb James, who makes great stuff.
    Also attached is a tool with some guy’s owner’s mark.

    Makers stamps sometimes also involve artwork or pictures. I have a Turtle plane made in London which not surprisingly haas a picture of a…..tortoise.

    And googling P. Everett does yield the proprietor of Knicknack Toys. Maybe it was his. 😛

    • This reply was modified 4 months, 3 weeks ago by Larry Geib.
    • This reply was modified 4 months, 3 weeks ago by Larry Geib.
    Attachments:
    #663906
    Jez Downs
    Participant

    The only stamp on the plane is the one in the picture I took behind the handle. From the look of your pictures I would say it’s the owner not the maker.

    Thanks for the advice regarding hide glue. I’ll look into it and post results.

    #663910
    Larry Geib
    Participant

    Whatever you posted must have been cropped by the inter web little people, because I can’t see a stamp.

    Whoops, I see it. makers stamps are alway stamped into the end grain on planes.

    • This reply was modified 4 months, 3 weeks ago by Larry Geib.
    #664355
    Jez Downs
    Participant

    Got the handle out (it pretty much fell out) so need to clean and reglue.

    Is it meant to look so rough in there?

    Attachments:
    #664645
    Rafael Herrera
    Participant

    The handle well was never meant to be seen again, so it didn’t need to look neat. Research the use of hide glue, it’s very interesting, then attempt to re-attach the handle if you feel inclined to use it.

    #665513
    Jez Downs
    Participant

    Shim on the side for a tight fit, Titebond hide glue, and crossed fingers…

    Attachments:
    #665654
    Jez Downs
    Participant

    Good as new. Thanks for all the help.

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