Making a polissior polisher

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    Topic
  • #49814
    Greg MerrittGreg Merritt
    Participant

    Over on Chris Schwarz blogs, he has been discussing the use of the french polissior (polisher) to create a burnished and waxed finish. Its a simple tool and I’m a big fan of natural finishes, so I gave it a try. I made my own from an old whisk broom and twine. It turned out pretty well. I then used it, along with some bees wax, on a piece of cherry. WOW! Unbelievably smooth finish. Its worth a look.

    http://hillbillydaiku.com

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Viewing 15 replies - 16 through 30 (of 44 total)
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  • #52958
    sidreilleysidreilley
    Participant

    @sidreilley

    Thanks for the link Greg. There is also some info on Don William’s site, Dons Barn, where he has some links to u-tube videos where he demonstrates one and talks about the technique and soaking it with beeswax. I think it has a lot of potential for projects I’m planing, guess I’m a beeswax/linseed oil kind of guy.

    Cheers

    #53832
    Jonathan WrightJonathan Wright
    Participant

    @drawnwright

    Ooooh, Greg. I’m a knot geek, and a woodworking one, so this is right up my beeswax alley. Thanks for posting how to make one. Like Sid, I too am an oil and wax guy, and just don’t seem to enjoy using shellac the same way Paul does. (I also deviate from Paul a little, and only use bevel-up planes. But that’s another topic for another day.) One question that I can’t find ever since I saw Don Williams’ video on the polissoir: do you use solid beeswax, or a paste?

    Iqaluit, Canada. Chilly most of the time.

    #53835
    Greg MerrittGreg Merritt
    Participant

    @gman3555

    Glad you like it Jonathan. As to the wax. I tried mine with solid bees wax and also with Trewax brand paste wax. Both worked equally well for me. So my assumption is that any quality wax will wok for this method. I did find the solid bees wax easier to work with though. There is more feedback from the wood while using the polisoir with the solid bees wax. I just rubbed the cake in a zig-zag pattern on the wood and went to work. The Trewax was much more slippery during the process due to the the thinner vehicle it contains.

    I believe that I will mostly use the solid bees wax when using this method and I would recommend setting the tool up with molten bees wax to start with. The paste wax will tend to become powdery if applied thickly to the tip of the polissoir while the solid bees wax will remain pliable.

    http://hillbillydaiku.com

    #54629
    Scott VScott V
    Participant

    @rroselavy

    The “Polissior” is something every interested woodworker should be able to easily make for themselves. Thanks Greg for the exemplary instructions. I love the knot tying details. Your soft-pencil illustrational style and use of color reminds me of Aldren A. Watson as much as it does H.A.Rey.

    -Scott Los Angeles, California, USA

    #54805
    Greg MerrittGreg Merritt
    Participant

    @gman3555

    I could not agree more Scott. I think we can learn as much, if not more, by making/building our own tools and jigs. I hate to see something simple shown or demonstrated and then followed up with “here is where you can buy it”. I have no problem purchasing things that are beyond my facilities or capabilities though. But show me how to make it for myself then let me decide to make or buy. Thats one of the things I like about Paul’s style and methods. Anyway, that is why I post these type of things.

    Also, thank you for the comparison to such very talented illustrators. I’m no where near their level, but I keep plugging away. I can’t begin to tell you how much it means to me that people find my doodles useful.

    http://hillbillydaiku.com

    #55420
    jespiirjespiir
    Participant

    @jespiir

    Great work Greg!

    Your drawings really put a silver lining to the Woodworking Masterclasses projects. I was very happy that you get some attention on the Schwarz blog. Way to go 🙂

    Kind regards
    Jesper

    Located in Jönköping, Sweden.

    #55802
    Greg MerrittGreg Merritt
    Participant

    @gman3555

    Than you Jesper. I’m glad you enjoy them.

    http://hillbillydaiku.com

    #56894
    Greg MerrittGreg Merritt
    Participant

    @gman3555

    Don Williams explaining the polissoir.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0LWePTM6M7Q

    http://hillbillydaiku.com

    #56925
    JayJay
    Participant

    @jochs99

    Hey Greg… I went out today and picked up a small straw broom, and after that is where my questions start as I have absolutely zero knowledge about rope or knots. The guys at Lowe’s had never heard of the “tarred nylon” that you list in your drawing. I’m guessing it’s a specialty item I would have to pick up somewhere? Is there something I can substitute? They had something called mason line and paracord (I think the paracord was too thick). Also, can I just stick with the thin cord and do the constrictor knots and leave off the larger knots you list as decorative, or do you recommend them both to hold it well?

    Thanks for your help… I’m gonna try to get this thing put together. 🙂

    #56926
    Greg MerrittGreg Merritt
    Participant

    @gman3555

    Jay @jochs99 tarred nylon is sort of a specialty item. There is more info on the on my blog post. You might be able to find it in the fishing section of Wal*Mart sold as bank line. But mason line will work its just a little slick. So a couple drops of CA (super) glue will ensure that nothing slips. The turks head knots are decorative and add a little extra security. They are not absolutely necessary though. Just add a couple more constrictor knots, maybe a wrap of duct tape and call it done.

    Make sure you grate your bees wax before you try to melt it. You will be forever trying to melt chances of bees wax. Use an old cheese grater or just use a knife. The smaller and thinner the better.

    Hope that helps. If not, ask away.

    http://hillbillydaiku.com

    #56927
    JayJay
    Participant

    @jochs99

    Ok, sounds good. Thank you. I’ll try to find the tarred nylon, and I should have a rotary grater around here for the wax. I actually need to buy some bees wax too. lol

    I took a look at your blog yesterday, by the way and I was impressed. Very nice work and I’ll be reading over it more later.

    *edit* Called around a few places and it’s looking like the bank line may not be available around here (no surprise). I’ll probably have to get it from Amazon.

    #56928
    Greg MerrittGreg Merritt
    Participant

    @gman3555

    Jay you could just as easily use a couple of shoe strings as well. It doesn’t have to be tarred nylon. It’s just that I find the tarred nylon the best all around twine for several projects.

    http://hillbillydaiku.com

    #56933
    JayJay
    Participant

    @jochs99

    Ok, sounds good. I just wanted to use whatever would work best. I did notice, since I started reading about the bank line, that a lot of the bushcraft guys use it for knots, nets, etc… I figure you already know that, but I thought it was interesting.

    #56934
    SandySandy
    Participant

    @sandy1man

    I’ll make one of those tomorrow. I have a project waiting on it!

    Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.

    Albert Einstein

    #56935
    SandySandy
    Participant

    @sandy1man

    Jay, if you want the tarred nylon you can get it at most leather craft stores. But they call it waxed nylon (I believe it’s the same thing.).

    Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.

    Albert Einstein

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