Making a saw.

  • Creator
    Topic
  • #550428
    kjellhar
    Participant

    I had a need for a spesial purpose saw that I could not get in the store. It should be quite small, the blade should be 2mm thick and cut for long grain 12 tpi.

    But since Paul has taught us how to recut the teeth on a saw, that was not a proble at all. I just got a suitable piece of steel (2x30mm bar), and started forking according to his instructions.

    [attachment file=550429]
    [attachment file=550430]

    I had to make some sort of handle as well, which I made of ash. I looks a bit funny, but it is actually quite ergonomic.

    [attachment file=550431]

    So I would just say thanks to Paul and the team for showing us these sort of things.

    Best regards from Norway,
    Kjell

    Attachments:
Viewing 10 replies - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
  • Author
    Replies
  • #550452
    David B
    Participant

    @dbockel2

    Nice. Is it a push-cut?

    #550453
    kjellhar
    Participant

    @kjellhar

    Yes, it’s a push.

    Looking at it, it is just a slightly smaller gents saw with a bit coarser teeth than usual and a wide blade. Also, I have not ….. ooo what’s the word for it in English ….. bend the saw teeth to alternating sides??

    I am using the saw for cutting slits in the end of arrows. First to fit a 2mm reinforcement plate into the back end of the arrow, and then to cut the arrow nock, which is the small slit at the back of the arrow where you snap on the bow string. This little saw makes the process very efficient. It is much faster to cut the slits, and they turn out almost perfect, which saves a lot of time with files and sand paper.

    #550454
    YrHenSaer
    Participant

    @howardinwales

    Very fine indeed. Before I read the detail I envisaged a need for a slot of some kind with a defined size..
    Necessity is the Mother of Invention…. (with apologies to Frank Zappa!)

    #550456
    Ecky H
    Participant

    @eckyh

    [quote quote=550453]Also, I have not ….. ooo what’s the word for it in English ….. bend the saw teeth to alternating sides??[/quote]
    “Saw set” or just “set”.

    Well done, Kjell. Which sort of steel did you use for that saw?
    Oh – it would be nice if you could tell something more about arrow making – and probably about bow making as well? 🙂

    E.

    Veni, vidi, serravi.

    Münster, Germany

    #550462
    kjellhar
    Participant

    @kjellhar

    [quote quote=550456][quote quote=550453]Also, I have not ….. ooo what’s the word for it in English ….. bend the saw teeth to alternating sides??[/quote]

    “Saw set” or just “set”.

    Well done, Kjell. Which sort of steel did you use for that saw?

    Oh – it would be nice if you could tell something more about arrow making – and probably about bow making as well? 🙂

    E.[/quote]

    Ooo, that would be big topic, which other more capable bowyers around the internet already have covered in depth.

    Regarding the steel. It was sold on the ebay as “spring steel”. I’m not sure about the springiness of it, but seems like bar of ordinary carbon steel, comparable to the steel used in commercial saw that you can sharpen yourself. Maybe a bit softer, but not much. It is fairly easy to work using file and hack saw. It will cut ash easily without dulling noticeably.

    #550463
    kjellhar
    Participant

    @kjellhar

    An arrow nock (not with the insert, which would have been done before the nock)

    • This reply was modified 11 months ago by kjellhar.
    Attachments:
    #550587
    ehisey
    Participant

    @ehisey

    @kjellhar, Are you making shafts for personal use or sale? And do you happen to know a supplier for 38-40″ 15/32 to 1/2 blanks? I practice Manchu style Archer and have a devil of time sourcing arrows. Especially at the higher weights needed by military weight bows.

    Tuscloosa, Alabama
    Lung T'an Hu Huesh Kung-fu Woodshop

    #550592
    kjellhar
    Participant

    @kjellhar

    @ehisey
    so far I have only made arrows for personal use. I buy most shafts as ready made dowels, but I have also made some shafts by planing them, which is too much work.

    There is a guy here in Norway who makes warbow shafts. 1/2 inch ash shafts are pretty stiff, maybe around 150lb or so, but the ones he sell on his web shop is only 34 inch long. Also, you’re in Alabama, I’m in Norway, which would mean quite expensive shipping. For some reason it is more expensive to send goods from Norway to a given location than the other way.

    But, since you’re in this forum I guess you do some woodworking yourself. Why don’t you make a dowel cutter using some scrap wood and a cheap chisel, get som ash boards at you local wood supplier and off you go.
    Here is one link showing how: DIY dowel cutter
    Google for more examples.

    #550595
    ehisey
    Participant

    @ehisey

    @kjellhar, I am painfully aware of import prices. I have to import most of my gear from China. The typical historical manner for manchu was to actually plane the double taper shafts. I have done some arrow making, but I seem to be in a bad spot locally for wood suppliers. I can get all the builder grade pine I want, but any thing else proves difficult. And to be honest, it is one area I like to be lazy, rather take my shooting time shooting than fletching.

    1/2 Ash shafts are just getting stiff enough for 50# manchu style bows. Between the 36in draw and agressive nature of contact long ear bows, I need a 250 spine for a 50# bow. 60#+ bows will take an arrow as stiff as you can make it. Take a look at manchuarchery.org, the difference between the longbow and manchu are quite interesting.

    Tuscloosa, Alabama
    Lung T'an Hu Huesh Kung-fu Woodshop

    #550611
    kjellhar
    Participant

    @kjellhar

    @ehisey, 250lb spine?? You could just use fence posts. I guess it is mandatory to taper the shafts in this case, as that would remove mass from the tip and lower the necessary spine a little bit. I can see why you find it difficult to source these shafts. I don’t know of any source for them.

    Just out of curiosity, what type of wood is most common for these arrows?

Viewing 10 replies - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.