Welcome! Forums General Woodworking Discussions Projects Making a small croze for tankards (groove cutter to fit the bottom)

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  • #142369
    Hugo Notti
    Participant

    Some people might have seen my other project, making a wooden tankard. The bottom of the tankard sits in a groove which I had cut with a saw and chisel. This was tedious work and traditional coopers had a nice tool instead, a croze. It consists of a body with one or several blades, adjustable, or not, very simplistic or even highly sophisticated.

    Use your favourite search engine to see, how crozes look like and how they are used.

    My plan:

    I got a length of 4x10mm malleable steel to cut a roamer from.
    And I got about 20 m of 0.5x10mm of similar steel for two scribing blades.
    I got some hardwood scraps to make the body of the croze.

    The roamer will act like a chisel, cutting edge with a bevel, and remove the bulk of the waste.

    The scribing blades will be located on the sides of the roamer and are supposed to create a clean edge.

    I will use another piece of the 4x10mm steel to make a latch to hold the blades together and fix them to the body of the croze.

    The depth of the groove can be altered by positioning the blades. The distance of the groove from the rim of the tankard will be fixed for now.

    When I have finished the blades, I will try to harden them with a blow-torch. It won’t take too long to get the material to the highest possible temperature, I am just not sure, if the blow-torch will provide enough heat. If this fails, I will have to sharpen often, but it should still work. Tempering in a cooking stove works fine, I have already tested that.

    It might take a few days until I can show first results, because I am not good at metalworking. But I know how to sharpen blades and I can use a file. So it should be fairly easy.

    In case the 0.5 mm for the scribing blades is too weak, I have an old saw blade, but it is hardened and therefore not good to work with.

    Dieter

    PS: The drawing is wrong, the scribing blade will have the bevel on the inside.

    • This topic was modified 3 years, 9 months ago by Hugo Notti.
    • This topic was modified 3 years, 9 months ago by Hugo Notti.
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    #142475
    Hugo Notti
    Participant

    Quick update

    I made a roaming blade. The metal is astonishingly soft, it only took a few minutes to create the bevel. It took the same amount of time to sharpen it, because it is to tiny. I then realised, that 10 mm is too wide, I had to cut it in half, now I have two blades.

    Making the scribing blades was much faster.

    I fixed them in a piece of wood, fastened with another piece of 10×4 mm steel. It does not do the job just like that, even the outside blades are moving, when I try to cut.

    This is where I stopped, I might make a few experiments this weekend.

    Dieter

    #143476
    Hugo Notti
    Participant

    So far a total failure! I have looked into crozes and – again, just like the tankard project, the small size makes it difficult. Attached a picture of the failed device (no depth control or alignment yet, just testing the principle). As you can see, the upper blade points to the side, it didn’t stay put. And the main blade moved to the other side.
    another failed device was a simple rounded piece of wood with a sharpened nail head. It didn’t do anything to the wood at all.

    In the meantime, I found some videos about “shrink pots”, which need a groove too. And someone came up with a nice set of tools (around 2:00): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZE9L-WSS7VQ

    Apparently a broomstick with a blade epoxied into a drilled hole. I like the concept, having one scribing blade for each side and the planing tool to remove the waste, all used after each other instead of in one step.

    And I found another tool on ebay (too expensive to buy, but nice pictures, that I won’t steal to show them). It has a brass plate, round on the blade sides, housing two blades, one for scribing and one for roaming. This is more work to do, but on metal, it is easier to work on the needed level of accuracy. And the brass plate can also be used as a depth gauge, it will cut exactly as deep as it protrudes from the plane body.

    Well, I am quite busy doing other things right now, but this project will continue.

    Dieter

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