Marking Knife

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  • #29056
    vnesterov
    Participant

    I’m looking for a good marking knife in the under $40 range. Im going to be doing the bookshelf projected here shortly and I’ve found that without scribing the lines I cant make the mortices straight with a chisel. I will likely be using harder woods like Oak or Maple for most of my work so im looking for a tool that works best with harder woods. LV is having free shipping this week so something out of their catalog might be a good choice.

    #29057
    Juan-M
    Participant

    I would search Paul’s blog for Stanley knife. That would be the one he uses, and I think most of do as well as a result. If you live in the USA you might find it at your local ACE Hardware but it’s kind of rare. Otherwise Home Depot has it for ordering online with free in store pick up

    #29059
    vnesterov
    Participant

    I guess 7 bucks from amazon delivered Friday, cant really go wrong with that. Link for reference http://www.amazon.com/Stanley-10-049-Pocket-Knife-Rotating/dp/B00002X201/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1395253149&sr=8-1&keywords=10-049

    #29060
    derek.eder
    Participant

    For teaching school children, I made 20 or so double bevelled marking knives from old hacksaw blades and scrap hardwood. The 2″ blade segments are epoxy glued into a saw kerf in the handle.

    I had access to a metal shear which made clipping the blades to shape easy. Alternately, I could have ground them or heat the blade to remove it’s temper (and then re harden later)

    One of the American woodworking magazines rated an ordinary X-Acto knife very highly as a marking knife too.

    The photo below shows one knife with a 3/8″ chisel for size comparison. Note the chisel needs honing 🙂

    #29068
    Scott
    Participant

    Vlad-

    Welcome to the WWMC community.

    The Stanley knife Paul uses is slightly different than the one you linked to. The UK version of that knife has a different model number, and is more slender. Looks like you get Paul’s version through Amazon for a few dollars more:

    -Scott Los Angeles

    #29069
    Scott
    Participant

    Just to add:

    I use a vintage Hyde (R. Murphy) knife, which is basically a blade holder with a rosewood handle. You can usually find them at tool swaps for $5-$10. Mine is sharpened double-bevel like the Stanley.

    Derek’s spear headed knife (single bevel) from a hack saw blade is a great idea. The late Jim Kingshott made his own this way from a really wide & thick hacksaw blade, and like most of his tools – that thing appeared to be ultra sharp and dead accurate.

    -Scott Los Angeles

    #31286
    derek.eder
    Participant

    For teaching school children, I made 20 or so single-bevel marking knives from old hacksaw blades and scrap hardwood. The 2″ blade segments are epoxy glued into a saw kerf in the handle.

    I had access to a metal shear which made clipping the blades to shape easy. Alternately, I could have ground them or heat the blade to remove it’s temper (and then re harden later)

    One of the American woodworking magazines rated an ordinary X-Acto knife very highly as a marking knife too.

    The photo below shows one knife with a 3/8″ chisel for size comparison. Note the chisel needs honing :)

    #36910
    SharpPencil
    Participant

    A very cheap and perfect marking knife I have found is an old bread and butter or dinner knife (bone type handle) normally about 20mm wide. Using a bench grinder reduce to 10mm wide x 30mm long on end and sharpen to a hook type point, works perfectly, can be sharpened on a stone. Best to use Sheffield steel.

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