old woodworking books

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)
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  • #21065
    David R.
    Participant

    Hello fellows,

    I stumbled upon a site with free old woodworking books:

    http://www.evenfallstudios.com/woodworks_library/woodworks_library.html

    I flipped through a few of those and found some I think might be worth studying further, here an example on different joints:

    http://www.evenfallstudios.com/woodworks_library/001/woodwork_joints.htm

    Maybe some of those are already known to you and some may contain questionable teachings, but I think there are some gems in there. Just read the good ones ๐Ÿ˜‰

    – David

    from Germany

    #21069
    Ken
    Participant

    Yes it’s a good little site David, I posted it on here a few months back.
    Thanks for the fresh link.

    #21644
    Cory
    Participant

    Hi Guys,
    I’m a first time post. I also found the evenfall sight, which is good. Try this link. Many of the books are public domain and I suspect this sight is the source for evenfall. Try searching under “carpentry” or “woodworking” instruction on the sight. Many of the books are listed redundantly under various authors and editions by the same publisher, etc. Overall, a really great resource.

    #21645
    Cory
    Participant

    Sorry, the link didn’t work for me. Oops. Anyway, it’s openlibrary.org.

    #21646
    Ken
    Participant

    Hey Cory, welcome to the forum and thanks for the link
    https://openlibrary.org

    #21820
    str8tedge
    Participant

    David R,

    Thanks for posting this. I actually have four of the books in the Wood Worker Series (Evans Brothers Ltd. London) that I found back in the 90’s at a small book seller’s in England.
    Woodwork Joints, Woodwork Tools, Practical Upholstery, and Carpentry for Beginners.

    Great little books figuratively and literally (5″ x 7-1/2″). The Upholstery book says first edition 1923 revised 1926. So that gives some idea of the age of the series. Appears to have been some 25 separate books covering all manner of woodworking subjects. These were the ‘Do it yourself’ books of their day but interestingly you will find most of Paul’s approaches to woodworking within their covers.

    Joe B.

    #21822
    Ken
    Participant

    Hi guys all this would have been better posted in the General Woodworking Discussions forum. Or the off – topic forum. I have just noticed that this is in the tool forum. ๐Ÿ˜‰

    #21833
    davebulow
    Participant

    The other day while searching on the internet for something I did come across a scanned copy of the Marples catalogue from 1938 ………..all 282 pages!!! It seems back then they published it as a book! It’s the most incredible, in-depth catalogue of hand-tools with diagrams I’ve ever seen. It really is quite amazing.

    I don’t know if this is of any interest to any of you. And if you’ve seen this kind of thing many times before then I do apologise, but I was quite excited, just because it’s so in-depth, and thought it’d be quite useful (for someone like me at least) to help identify some really really specific odd tool that I couldn’t quite put my finger on. I don’t know what you think.

    Anyway, here’s the link in case you’re interested: http://www.toolemera.com/bkpdf/MarplesCat1938.pdf

    #21837
    David Gill
    Participant

    What a fantastic book I would love to play bagsey out of that book

    Wigan, Lancs. England :

    #21848
    David R.
    Participant

    Hi guys all this would have been better posted in the General Woodworking Discussions forum. Or the off โ€“ topic forum. I have just noticed that this is in the tool forum.

    You are quite right, the general forum would be more appropriate. If one of the administrators (@joseph, @resi) would be so kind as to move this thread. Thanks.

    David

    from Germany

    #21851
    Resi Tomat
    Participant

    Just done guys! :o)
    enjoying the new home?
    love your discussions, keep posting. and Thanks to @joseph for showing me how to do it.

    #21852
    Ken
    Participant

    Good job Resi ๐Ÿ˜‰

    #21854
    str8tedge
    Participant

    Dave,

    Thanks for the link to the Marples Catalog. A wonderful reference and resource for old tools. On or about eighteen pages in, there is a man at the bench with his young apprentice.

    What I noticed in the 1938 picture was the simple two sided sharpening stone on the bench proving Paul’s point that all the modern ‘over fussing’ about sharpness and sharpening systems is really nonsense. I use a two sided stone all the time. Convex bevel then hone the blade on a strop and you can shave hair with it.

    Old time workers were in tune with their tools. After all they are only extensions of our hands.

    If anyone finds any other old catalogs please post them. It sometimes helps in identifying the makers (and or use) of tools found in yard sales etc.

    Great post,

    Joe B.

    #21857
    davebulow
    Participant

    Thanks @str8tedge . Yes regarding sharpening, completely agreed!

    About other catalogues – the page I found the Marples catalogue on was here: http://www.toolemera.com/Trade%20Catalogs/tradecatalogs193.html

    There are a few others there too. The one of most interest to me at the time was the Marples one, but you might find other interesting ones too, I don’t know? – best regards, Dave

    #21858
    str8tedge
    Participant

    Brilliant Dave, thanks for the follow-up catalog link.

    Joe B.

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