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Paul's Bench Finish (Basic Ingredients)?

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  • #554889
    Brian A
    Participant

    Paul puts a finish on his bench that he calls ‘natural outdoor furniture oil’. He wears gloves but no mask or visible ventilation, which suggest this is an attractive finish for my shop which does not have crosswind ventilation (and most finishes from the Orange stores have skulls and crossbones on them). He keeps the can hidden because he does not want to bias things with product sponsorship. Nevertheless, it would be useful to know the basic ingredients used in case we would like to make our own ‘natural outdoor furniture oil’ that does not kill us. Does anyone know, or suspect, what the composition might be?

    My guess is some sort of boiled linseed oil mixture, because it is yellowish, is in a metal can, and requires gloves (as most modern BLO’s contain moderately toxic/carcinogenic, yet non-volatile drying agents).

    Am I right, wrong, or completely off base?

    .

    #554899
    Alan
    Participant

    Perhaps Danish Oil? A similar-use product to BLO. Used for preserving wood, particularly outdoor furniture.

    #554902
    Jim Thornton
    Participant

    For what it’s worth. I’m putting a finish on a workbench I built out of European Beech. I’m using a blend of equal parts boiled linseed oil, beeswax, and turpentine. I’m pleased with the results. That said I haven’t put any finish on the top yet and will wait to make sure this blend is as good as I think it is.There may be ready made products that are similar.

    If you can't afford to do big things...........do small things in a big way!

    #554903
    Steve Petka
    Participant

    He actually answered this somewhere, its Ronseal https://www.ronseal.com/garden/garden-furniture/ultimate-protection-hardwood-furniture-oil/
    I looked it up but doesn’ tlook like I can get it this side of the pond. I’m guessing its similar to Minwax “tongue oil” finish, mix of tongue oil, varnish, solvents etc.

    #554905
    Brian A
    Participant

    Thanks for tracking that down. I know he’s talked about finishes a number of times but I don’t retain all the information. I didn’t find the MSDS for Ronseal but it looks fairly safe since they just say to wash your hands if it gets on you and nothing about ventilation, and yeah, not likely found in the US. I have some sort of ‘danish oil’ from the Orange store but after getting it home and reading the tiny warning text it seems to have the same old nasty V.O.C.s in it as most Minwax oil-based stuff, requiring cross-ventilation etc. I’m remaking the top. Already finished the base earlier with just BLO and a coat of beeswax, and that has held up fine, but I don’t want wax on the benchtop as I think it might be too slippery.

    Mixing in the wax and oil like Jim is doing sounds interesting (as does the European Beech, cool! Mine is construction studs – Douglas Fir probably). Maybe as a mixture it will form less of a slippery topcoat and more penetrating?

    .

    #554908
    Jim Thornton
    Participant

    [quote quote=554905]Thanks for tracking that down. I know he’s talked about finishes a number of times but I don’t retain all the information. I didn’t find the MSDS for Ronseal but it looks fairly safe since they just say to wash your hands if it gets on you and nothing about ventilation, and yeah, not likely found in the US. I have some sort of ‘danish oil’ from the Orange store but after getting it home and reading the tiny warning text it seems to have the same old nasty V.O.C.s in it as most Minwax oil-based stuff, requiring cross-ventilation etc. I’m remaking the top. Already finished the base earlier with just BLO and a coat of beeswax, and that has held up fine, but I don’t want wax on the benchtop as I think it might be too slippery.

    Mixing in the wax and oil like Jim is doing sounds interesting (as does the European Beech, cool! Mine is construction studs – Douglas Fir probably). Maybe as a mixture it will form less of a slippery topcoat and more penetrating?[/quote]

    Brian, I’m a little concerned about the wax on the bench top as well, since it’s already pretty slick from just planing. I’m thinking that I’m going to sand to 100 grit and use just a BLO/turpentine mix without the wax on the bench top. It can always be added later.

    Jim

    If you can't afford to do big things...........do small things in a big way!

    #554910
    Brian A
    Participant

    “Brian, I’m a little concerned about the wax on the bench top as well, since it’s already pretty slick from just planing. I’m thinking that I’m going to sand to 100 grit and use just a BLO/turpentine mix without the wax on the bench top. It can always be added later.

    Jim”

    That sounds like a good temporary plan. All my bench plans are temporary it seems. I may not even need the 100 grit since my planing has already left some of the boards a bit scruffy (the latter being theorized upon in a different thread currently).

    .

    #555069
    Steve Petka
    Participant

    For what its worth, I used 50/50 mix of BLO and turps, I put on a coat each day until it wouldn’t absorb anymore. I think about 5 or 6 coats. It has a nice grippy surface, not sticky, jus the right grip. I wouldn’t add wax to mine, I don’t want it slick.

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