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  • #26757
    Sandy
    Participant

    I’m going to ask this question and then I am going to run off and google for the answer but I figured with the expertise that is normally here someone would have a simple answer for me. In one of the videos that I watched yesterday Paul made a comment about using a Jack Plane. He said that the 5 1/2 plane is heavier than the # 4 plane he normally uses. Well I just bought a used 5 1/5 and it’s not as heavy as my #4 and not as wide. It is longer and they are both Stanley planes. I have a #5 and it is wider and heavier than either of the previously mentioned planes. So where is the standard for plane sizes?

    Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.

    Albert Einstein

    #26758
    Sandy
    Participant

    The one on the left is #4, on the right is 5 1/2

    edited: Sorry.. wrong picture on the right and I can’t delete it. so you’ll just have to ignore.. 🙂

    Edited again: I just noticed the 5 1/2 is actually a 5 1/4… but the question still remains..

    Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.

    Albert Einstein

    Attachments:
    #26761
    Greg Merritt
    Participant

    Sandy that’s not a #5-1/2 Jack plane. It’s a #5-1/4 Junior Jack.
    Here is a chart…
    http://primeshop.com/access/woodwork/stanleyplane/DataMisc.htm

    http://hillbillydaiku.com

    #26763
    Sandy
    Participant

    Greg,
    Yeah that was like posting the picture of my big tool chest and didn’t see the error until I looked at the picture.. It is indeed a 5 1/4. Doesn’t make sense thought that my #5 is bigger than either. But thanks for the link. I also found one for the Stanley planes..

    Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.

    Albert Einstein

    #26765
    Greg Merritt
    Participant

    The #5-1/4 junior jack was originally manufactured for manual training classes at schools. Stanley made them to be smaller than the standard #5.

    http://hillbillydaiku.com

    #26766
    Sandy
    Participant

    Greg, thats a good piece of history I didn’t know.

    Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.

    Albert Einstein

    #26768
    Greg Merritt
    Participant

    From what I’ve read, they became very popular with workers as well and were produced from the 1920’s thru 1983. A #4 and a #5-1/4 would be a great set for a traveling toolbox.

    http://hillbillydaiku.com

    #26771
    Peter George
    Participant

    My standard bench plane is a Veritas 5 1/4, which I received as gift from my wife. It’s a couple of inches longer than a no. 4 so it can be a bit more work smoothing, but it is a real joy to use, so I don’t mind. 🙂

    Peter in
    Biggar SK
    "New York is big, but this is Biggar"

    #26773
    Steve Follis
    Participant

    I usually think of the #5-1/4 as the Jack Plane version of a #3; junior sized planes. And the #5-1/2 is a beefier verion of the #5, just as the #4-1/2 is a beefier version of the #4.

    The planes I use most frequently are my #4 and #5-1/2.

    Memphis, Tennessee

    #27433
    Sandy
    Participant

    Greg, that was actually what I had in mind for both of these. My box will get finished if we ever thaw out. It’s been to darn cold to get our in the shop. I bet I’ll have a wood stove in there next year!

    Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.

    Albert Einstein

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