Plane Rescue

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 17 total)
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  • #132066
    ballinger
    Participant

    I found this neglected hand plane down in Cork in a flea market. The poor thing is in an awful state and it’s had some amount of abuse in it’s life from the back of the iron having it’s own bevel to the cap iron having been welded together. Not to mention the iron was put in upside down when I first disassembled it to figure out why I couldn’t adjust the depth.

    I paid too much money for it, the lady selling it was stubborn saying she wouldn’t sell it for anything less than 15 euro. But I decided to take a risk on it anyway knowing there was a good few hours work in it to see if it was usable or not – it’ll never be a smoother but it could be a very good scrub plane. Is it worth the risk? We’ll see.

    • This topic was modified 6 years, 9 months ago by ballinger.
    #132072
    donhansford
    Participant

    15 Euros, huh? Listen, I’ve got this bridge in Sydney for sale …. 🙂
    Looks like you’ve got a bit of work ahead of you, but I’ve been known to spend an inordinate amount of time (and sometimes money, too) on similar projects (old tools, old LandRovers, old women, etc), so best of luck with it. I look forward to seeing the end result of its’ resurrection.

    #132076
    Derek Long
    Participant

    Holy moly, did they use the plane as a concrete finishing trowel?

    Derek Long
    Denver, Colorado

    #132078
    Matt McGrane
    Participant

    That plane needs some serious work. It looks like the size of a #4, but it doesn’t say Stanley on it. Any idea who made it?

    You’ve got your work cut out for you. But if you’ve got the time, why not! Could be fun to see if you can get it singing again. Good luck.

    Matt, Northern California - Started a blog in 2016: http://tinyshopww.blogspot.com/

    #132082
    ballinger
    Participant

    I was trying to find a makers name on it but can’t see one anywhere other than the iron which is a Stanley but it’s definately not a Stanley. I think she’s a No.3

    #132083
    aarontobul
    Participant

    I haven’t rescued one that was that rough (yet), but I have fixed up a couple that had seen some use and abuse and thoroughly enjoyed it. If you can get that one into usable shape I reckon you’ll get at least fifteen euros worth of satisfaction out of it.

    #132084
    ballinger
    Participant

    Good call Aaron – I really need a scrub plane as I want to work with rough sawn timber and my smoother does work but is fairly time consuming to use. I’ll post an update shortly on how it’s going.

    #132108
    ballinger
    Participant

    So after a cleanup she’s looking more like a useable plane… the real test will be at the bench though. Compared to my Stanley No.4 the sole is the same length, the width is slightly narrower however (by 3mm). So maybe it is a number 4 I don’t know, couldn’t find a makers name on the plane anywhere. Under the cap iron is stamped a number 2.

    • This reply was modified 6 years, 9 months ago by ballinger.
    #132116
    ehisey
    Participant

    I suspect this will be come a favorite for you. I have mostly restored planes and love them. Looks good, how is the sole looking? That is the really test of a plane.

    Tuscloosa, Alabama
    Lung T'an Hu Huesh Kung-fu Woodshop

    #132117
    ballinger
    Participant

    I’ve only surface cleaned the sole and taken off the edges so it will ride over uneven surfaces. But I will pull out some sandpaper onto a flat surface and flatten it that way then probably finish it out on my course diamond stone.

    #132345
    ballinger
    Participant

    Well I tried this scrub plane out last night on a piece of timber that I couldn’t plane with my Stanley No.4 Smoother because the grain was resisting and the plane iron was only skimming over the top and not taking any shavings. If I planed in the other direction I got full on tear out. The scrub plane got it down very quickly, I was a bit taken aback at how fast it can remove the material. And it left a surface good enough to just finish out with a scraper. I’m delighted, the risk paid off!

    #132495
    Scott Chensoda
    Participant

    How satisfying that must be. Your ‘overpriced’ €15 special doing just the same quality of job, if not better, than a genuinely overpriced €180 Lie Nielsen. Think of all the black stuff you can drink with the difference.

    #132503
    SueinNC
    Participant

    It looks so much better. Amazing how some thing will clean up! How did you clean it up? Vinegar for the metal?

    #548565
    ballinger
    Participant

    @sueinnc I used some wd40, a wire brush, some wire wool, sandpaper. No vinegar or anything special… Oh and gloves.

    #549172
    markh
    Participant

    Congratulations on your work with that! Someone actually did quite a good job of that welding on the cast iron lever cap. If that welding ever fails you could probably get another lever cap from a donor plane – but that would mean another old plane….I can see an addiction setting in! 🙂
    Cheers
    Mark H

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