Prototype Plane

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  • This topic has 32 replies, 12 voices, and was last updated 8 years ago by Sandy.
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  • #22583
    NikonD80
    Participant

    Not sure if I should post this in the tool section but as it’s to do with building the bench stool I figured this is a better place for this…

    OK, it’s not as pretty as I’d like but this is the first ever plane I’ve made. It’s made from an old scrap of Pine that’s been sitting in my shop for ages. I wanted to have a go at making this as a flat soled plane before I try doing a curved version. I’m glad I did test this out as I found it a lot harder than Paul’s blog makes it look. I haven’t hardened or tempered the blade yet but after having shaped it I couldn’t resist taking a few swipes at some scrap timber. Happiness is that wonderful moment when you feel the plane glide over the wood and see lovely curly chips ejecting from the plane almost like spent cartridges from a gun.
    When I make the next one, I’ll want the blade to be a tad shorter and the wedge to be a bit longer – I suspect that his is down to the fact that my hands are probably smaller than Paul’s.

    Keep Calm and have a Cup of Tea

    #22585
    Eddy Flynn
    Participant

    well done jon i think the more of these you make the more refined they will become did you get your steel from the place Paul recommended

    Eddy .. Liverpool, Merseyside, UK
    ,

    #22587
    Ken
    Participant

    Nice work Jon, it looks great. Can I put my order in now please. 🙂

    #22622
    Greg Merritt
    Participant

    Well done Jon. Please post on how the tempering process goes for you.

    http://hillbillydaiku.com

    #22646
    NikonD80
    Participant

    Thanks guys. I’m hoping to do,the tempering tomorrow. I’ve got to but a small amount of oil first. I’ve turned my workshop upsidedown today but can I find my stock of oil that I carefully stored somewhere? Of course not.

    Keep Calm and have a Cup of Tea

    #22656
    Eddy Flynn
    Participant

    ive got loads of stuff somewhere when i come across it i wont know what i kept it for

    Eddy .. Liverpool, Merseyside, UK
    ,

    #22664
    George Bridgeman
    Participant

    Do you mean tempering, Jon? Oil is used in the hardening process. You heat the iron in a forge until it’s glowing red hot, then quench it in oil.

    Tempering is just holding the iron at a certain temperature for a certain time. You can do that in a regular oven but you don’t quench it afterwards.

    George.

    "To know and not do is to not know"

    #22665
    Mark Armstrong
    Participant

    George Paul said in his blog that after been in oven he cools blade down in warm water.
    Copy of a bit of his blog below.

    To harden the iron I used charcoal in a charcoal barbecue pit, but you could use a coal fire or a blow torch of some kind. A little extra air from a hair dryer increases the temperature quickly (No, not the heat from the dryer, the forced air) and soon the steel reaches the cherry red I need to quench it. Not all steels are created equal and depending on the steel you are using, it may take a hardness straight away or not. I have never had a problem but it can happen. I heat until the steel reaches cherry red and then plunge into used engine oil. To test for hardness, try a file on the steel. If it glides of it is now fully hardened. Now I temper the steel in the oven by leaving it in there at 300-degrees for an hour. Remove it and cool in warmish water and the steel should be hard but sharpenable.

    Dagenham, Essex, England

    #22666
    George Bridgeman
    Participant

    Thanks for the quote, Mark. That’s odd. I’d be interested in knowing why he does that. I remembered reading a bit about this in The Perfect Edge, and Ron Hock has an excerpt on his website that details how to harden and temper at home. He says just leave it to cool normally after tempering.

    http://hocktools.wordpress.com/2011/01/31/diy-heat-treatment-of-tool-steel/

    George.

    "To know and not do is to not know"

    #22667
    NikonD80
    Participant

    Ok guys, you’ve managed to confuse me a bit: I was planning on following Paul’s advice and use warm water. Am I better of. Just allowing the blade to air cool? Advice and assistance gratefully received.
    Thanks

    Keep Calm and have a Cup of Tea

    #22668
    Ken
    Participant

    Jon like every thing there is more than one way of doing things.
    Paul has never led us wrong yet, I would just follow his method.

    #22673
    Mark Armstrong
    Participant

    As George say Ron Hock lets steel cool by air he is a master of steel. Perhaps better to let cool down by air.
    They reason why I think pay say use warm water is so you can work on blade straight away.

    Dagenham, Essex, England

    #22675
    George Bridgeman
    Participant

    I didn’t mean to confuse you, Jon! Mark is probably right in saying that he cools it in water so you can get sharpening immediately.

    I was only wondering about what you were using the oil for. Are you tempering the blade in an oil bath?

    George.

    "To know and not do is to not know"

    #22683
    NikonD80
    Participant

    Hi George, The Oil was for hardening not tempering.

    I’ve just come in from the workshop having completed the hardening process so I’ll report now in case this is of any use to anyone else.

    I had to buy some new oil – I just couldn’t find my stock anywhere. I got bog standard regular engine oil – I tried to avoid anything with helpful additives.

    I first tried to heat the blade using my blowtorch but I simply couldn’t get the steel hot enough. I could get a corner to start glowing red but not any more. I still had a disposable BBQ pack though so I broke that open and used some of those ‘coals’ in a small foil tray.

    I used my hot air gun to provide some air to the base of the fire and in a couple of minutes the blade was glowing cherry red.

    Keep Calm and have a Cup of Tea

    #22688
    NikonD80
    Participant

    I had poured a generous amount of the oil into another foil tray so when the blade was all aglow, I took it out of the fire and plunged it onto the oil and sloshed it about a bit (gently). When you plunge the blade, there’s very little sound but you get a lot of oil smoke and there’s a heck of a stink so make sure you do this out doors. Another thing I noticed is that the oil gets surprisingly warm surprisingly quickly.

    The blade is now a dull black colour. I gently tested a file on the side and it skitters across the surface so I’ve definitely hardened the blade. Whether it’s as hard as it needs to be is another matter. I have removed the blade form the oil and given it a wipe over with a cloth. By this stage it was just warm to the touch – not hot at all. The time between plunging the blade into the oil and poking it with an exploratory finger was a good five minutes by the clock. I’ll leave the blade overnight and attend to the tempering tomorrow. I’m going to stick to the method in Paul’s blog.

    Keep Calm and have a Cup of Tea

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