Viewing 12 posts - 16 through 27 (of 27 total)
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  • #635481
    Ed
    Participant

    One door frame is done. The other is done except for cutting tenons, so it is close. I forgot to account for the groove depth in the mortise width, so there is a gap; however, it will be hidden by the panel. I think of it as eight hidden compartments, just like the old masters used to make. I also screwed up the first haunch, but it’s the one 7 feet up in the air, facing the ceiling. The old masters didn’t do that, though. I wish I’d tracked my time on this project, but forgot to do it in my haste.

    Attachments:
    #637324
    Ed
    Participant

    A couple photos. Two lessons for when you’re trying to be done quickly. First, order your hardware right away or you risk waiting for it. Second, saving money by resawing to make panels adds a lot of time, especially when you are pushing your luck by resawing 3/4″ S4S to get a panel for a 1/4″ groove. The doors will be inset, but are just laying on top for the moment.

    Attachments:
    #637328
    Ed
    Participant

    Fitting and hanging doors is going to be tricky since the stupid thing is taller than my shop and has to stick up into the joists to stand.

    Attachments:
    #637461
    Sven-Olof Jansson
    Participant

    Ed,

    When trying out large doors, I usually do that with the frame/carcass lying horisontal on the bench. If the frame is not too wide I clamp some pieces on its inside to prevent from falling through. For wider frames, I’ve glued the support pieces to the frame with grease paper in between.

    Do you think it would be possible to use the shelf holes of your frame to hold support pieces?

    Sven-Olof Jansson
    London, UK; Boston, MA

    #637473
    Ed
    Participant

    Sven-Olof, I thought about that, but since the tolerance on hanging an inset cabinet door is 1/64 to 1/32, I was concerned that having the weight of the cabinet in a different orientation might cause some tension that would affect the fit. My fallback is to do something like what you’ve suggested. Right now, or as soon as I go back downstairs, I’m standing on a bucket and working between the joists. The door is fitted, hinges are on the door, and I’m just starting to cut mortises for the hinges on the cabinet. The big question is whether I can open the door far enough between the joists to put screws in and out to test fitting. We’ll know within the hour (unless the garage calls and says my car is ready to be picked up). 🙂

    • This reply was modified 6 months, 2 weeks ago by Ed.
    #637504
    Sven-Olof Jansson
    Participant

    Sorry if I’m late Ed.

    If the back is in place, I don’t think the carcass will move very much, if anything.

    If you plan to have shelves then the door can rest on those. Please see attached photo. After all, a fall back might be an expression for retreat reserved for the defeated party, it is still likely to be preferable to falling on one’s back.

    (Picture shows the boy’s chemistry cabinet. I really don’t want to know what my bottle of Frapin XO VIP holds today)

    Sven-Olof Jansson
    London, UK; Boston, MA

    Attachments:
    #639524
    Ed
    Participant

    A couple quick photos…finish is going on now. I did end up fitting and hanging the doors with the cabinet on its side and the back on. It actually did turn out to be a problem. There’s a bit of sag in any hinge and, also, you just see things differently in different orientations. This cabinet doesn’t have tight tolerances for the space around the door, so it will be fine. I wanted to leave lots of room for expansion in the humid bathroom. (Also, I cut the door a bit small before fitting, so my hand was forced). Final gap is around 1/16 to 3/32″. Really, though, there was no choice but to do it on its side. A storm came in when I was trying to work, so it just couldn’t be done outside.

    Having the shelves as stops will be partly what happens. I’m also going to use magnetic catches, top and bottom (probably) as stops.

    You can see in the photos that the thing went out to The Infinite Shop for a final check and some adjusting.

    First coat of finish is on now.

    Now that it’s standing, I don’t like my choice of where I put the stile with cathedral grain. It’s what I had, and it had to go somewhere. I selected orienting it with the cathedrals toward the panel and the long, straight grain toward the hinge, but now I think it might have looked better flipped the other way. Because of color, I put it up top to match the color of the other parts of that door, but I wish that cathedral grain was down at the bottom. As a carpenter once told me, “The eye starts high when a person enters a room,” so I wish it was down lower.

    • This reply was modified 6 months, 1 week ago by Ed.
    Attachments:
    #639532
    Ed
    Participant

    By the way, Paul teaches that you should cut the hinge mortise with a bit of slope so that the hinge leaves are open a tiny bit when the door is closed, i.e., open in angle, not just the bit of gap that’s comes from the pin. The idea is to leave clearance for the screw heads which, for him, protrude a bit because he sets them off center in their holes.

    One thing to point out is to keep that bit of slope *small.* I made mine a bit too much. I figured, more depth won’t hurt anything and I won’t fuss thinking too much about it. The unforeseen outcome was that the hinge pin center pivots around the edge of the mortise because of this slope, and this changes the gap on the hinge side of the door.

    What I do now is to cut the mortise flat and true, first, and then deepen by about 1/64 to 1/32 on the far side. I check that with my little engineers square (as a depth gauge) after deepening just the last 1/4″ of the mortise, next to the wall that abuts the far side of the leaf. When that depth is right, which only takes a moment, I then work a uniform slope by paring from the outside edge (without changing its depth!) back to the wall that abuts the far side of the leaf.

    If you’re not careful with this, you can really make fitting the door come out other than your intend.

    • This reply was modified 6 months, 1 week ago by Ed.
    #640535
    Sven-Olof Jansson
    Participant

    Thanks Ed,

    A kitchen cabinet at our croft will have its hinge mortices shimmed, and replaced along your model. Apart from better closing doors, it will save me from further “witty comments”.

    With an experience from lift-off hinges for front and internal doors, where the leaves are flat against each other when the hinge (door is closed), butt hinges for lids and cabinet doors have been a challenge not consistently overcome. In particular I’ve learnt that putting the leaves of an inexpensive “brass” butt hinge in a vice to bring the leaves flush to each other, will result in the leaves falling off the hinge – revealing surfaces of a non-declared alloy. Ever since, Brusso prices appear more reasonable to me.

    Your bathroom cabinet looks really nice!!

    Sven-Olof Jansson
    London, UK; Boston, MA

    #643118
    Ed
    Participant

    All done. Well, sort of all done: The shelves need some finish, but they cupped when I resawed them, so I’ll wait a bit before finishing. It wasn’t very quick, eh?

    IMG_3846

    IMG_3850

    • This reply was modified 6 months ago by Ed.
    Attachments:
    #643465
    Sven-Olof Jansson
    Participant

    Ed,

    It’s a seven feet tall project!

    Quite impressive, and many thanks for sharing.

    Sven-Olof Jansson
    London, UK; Boston, MA

    #643492
    Harvey Kimsey
    Participant

    Nice job Ed. You’ll get a lot of use for it. I agree about cathedral grain. It always drives me crazy. One option is to paint it. I like that you used 3 hinges per door.

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