Radius Bottom Plane

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  • #127506
    Jude Kennyjude
    Participant

    I made a radius bottom plane a couple of days ago. This was principally for practice for making other planes in the future, so it is a bit rough-and-ready.

    judekenny.wordpress.com

    Near Chicago, USA

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Viewing 9 replies - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
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  • #127508
    Jude Kennyjude
    Participant

    @jude

    The sides of this plane are oak, the main body is some old pine and the blade is from an old block plane that I don’t use.

    I shaped the plane for the most part with a rasp and sanded a little bit, but didn’t go too far.

    I shaped the blade with a bench grinder and then sharpened it on the diamond stones.

    judekenny.wordpress.com

    Near Chicago, USA

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    #127511
    Jude Kennyjude
    Participant

    @jude

    I gave the little plane a coat of stain. I had thought of keeping the two-tone and think maybe I should have. However, I’m not going to get hung up on the color.

    The intent for the radius bottom plane is to use it on a stool or such like thing.

    It has proven useful already though on another project which is putting some wood on a curved wall. In the photo, you can see the curved shaped which can’t be planed with another tool, maybe just a spokeshave.

    I’m pretty happy with the new tool. Nice to have one I made myself.

    judekenny.wordpress.com

    Near Chicago, USA

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    #127515
    dborndborn
    Member

    @dborn

    Very nice! Are you getting ready to build a stool?

    #127519
    Jude Kennyjude
    Participant

    @jude

    @dborn Yes, I’m getting ready for the stool project. Some time. Whenever that is. Hopefully soon.

    I have been looking for a gouge too, but I don’t think that is necessary to get going.

    judekenny.wordpress.com

    Near Chicago, USA

    #127535
    dborndborn
    Member

    @dborn

    I want to make a still as well, i just have lots of off cures to get through before i start a new project.

    I have had luck finding old gives on ebay. Might want to keep an eye out there. However sometimes its just cheaper to buy new.

    #127549
    Matt McGraneMatt McGrane
    Participant

    @mattmcgrane

    Nice, Jude. Great idea using an old block plane iron. I’ve been wanting to make one of those curved-sole planes for a long time. I hope to find the time soon.

    Matt, Northern California - Started a blog in 2016: http://tinyshopww.blogspot.com/

    #134341
    John Gibsonsodbuster
    Participant

    @sodbuster

    Nice work Jude! What did you use as a starting block, & what final dimensions? I am making a radius plane for a windsor chair bottom & am looking for input on sizing, radius both long-ways & across, …

    Cheers,
    John

    #134890
    Jude Kennyjude
    Participant

    @jude

    @sodbuster

    Sorry I didn’t see your post. I don’t check in here so often anymore.

    I copied the design for my plane from Paul’s video and more so from Greg Merritt’s drawing.

    Wooden Planes Progress

    I think I copied the dimensions at 2″ wide by 2″ tall by 5″ long.

    judekenny.wordpress.com

    Near Chicago, USA

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    #135394
    John Gibsonsodbuster
    Participant

    @sodbuster

    Thanks, and sorry to be slow responding. I have finished my beta-version radius plane – poplar, with a 36mm replacement blade part # 07P1011 from LV. This size works well when using nominal 2″ thick stock – which is 1 1/2″ or 38mm from the lumberyard. width at centre 1 13/16″, overall length 6″, max height 1 3/4″. long radius approx 7″, short radius approx 3″. bed angle 45 degrees.

    The LV blade was low-cost, easy to flatten & sharpen, and has done well in use so far.

    I made it from an offcut. Intended use was for saddling a windsor chair seat after the scorp. I had a lovely old plane with a repurposed 2″ blade, but it didn’t have a tight enough radius either fore – aft or port – starboard.

    What worked:
    – larger size – I started with about 7 ” long stock. It fits the hand pretty well.
    – rounding fore & aft, with a slightly narrower stern – coffin – again for hand comfort
    – using dowels in the blank to keep parts aligned in glue-up <– top tip

    Better next time:
    – precision in marking / sawing / filing ledges for each side of wedge.
    – bolder, bigger throat opening to start. The round blade scoops up shavings that jam easily in a narrow throat.
    – better attantion to marking pieces and hand-planing the inside faces for a better glueline
    – maybe a wider radius across – 4″ maybe.

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