Raised garden box

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  • #138329
    Alien8
    Participant

    Hi all

    my latest endavour is a raised garden box. We’ve had some leftover t&g boards from the garden shed build, so I figured I’d make something usefull out of it.
    The garden shed is built out of stacked t&g boards using halving joints at the corners. So I used the tricks from the assembly table videos as a guide.

    First some crosscutting to reduce the 4,5 m boards to something a little more managable.
    cut boards

    Made a test joint from some left overs. Kiki, our favourite house tiger gave her blessing.
    house tiger

    Making the joints went ok, had some trouble putting it all together as these boards were bowed and twisted quite a bit. And it’s a very soft species of pine, often even containing the center of the tree. The company that supplied that garden shed is obviously more interested in making profit than supplying a descent product.
    layout

    almost there

    I decided halfway to ‘alternate’ the halving joints so I could stack the layers easily.

    More to follow.

    appreciate any comments
    Diego

    • This topic was modified 6 years, 1 month ago by Alien8.
    • This topic was modified 6 years, 1 month ago by Alien8. Reason: Putting in pics
    • This topic was modified 6 years, 1 month ago by Alien8.
    #138337
    Richard Senior
    Participant

    Looking good. I wonder if the wood is spruce?

    I’ve used raised beds for vegetables in the past and I would suggest thinking about a frame that fits over the top with some sort of wire mesh to keep birds from snacking on your seedlings. Maybe hinged, maybe just laid on top and stored somewhere when not needed.

    #138367
    Alien8
    Participant

    Next batter was to make some legs. Had to make a trip to the lumber yard to get something suitable. I wanted 60×60 mm legs, the t&g boards are 90 mm high. So the legs look as they can support the weight.

    Started preparing the stock.
    first ones

    It was really hot that day so ripping and planing went slower than I’d liked.
    half way
    I used my mortice gage set to the smallest width between pins, about 4 mm. That gives me enough room to wander about.
    gauge marks
    Around noon it was already quite hot and humid, it peaked at 32℃ and 55% rh. The fan was really helpful!
    too damp

    Diego

    • This reply was modified 6 years, 1 month ago by Alien8.
    • This reply was modified 6 years, 1 month ago by Alien8.
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