Resawing techniques

  • Creator
    Topic
  • #129893
    gallarotti
    Participant

    Show of hands: how many of you do resawing by hand and how many use a band saw?
    Given that I will never purchase a bandsaw, for sure, and that I don’t have the luck to live anywhere close to a lumberyard that sells thin stocks, I guess I will need to do all my resawing by hand.
    I have done my homework online and researched different techniques, but I would like to hear, from those of you who often (or always) resawing by hand, your experiences, your suggestions, your gotchas, etc.
    In the saw department I only own a small tenon saw and I am thinking of purchasing a crosscut panel saw 10tpi and possibly a longer 4.5tpi rip cut panel saw, so I’d be particularly interested to hear from those of you who do use similar saws to do your resawing, if it’s even possible.

Viewing 15 replies - 16 through 30 (of 39 total)
  • Author
    Replies
  • #129931
    Salko Safic
    Participant

    @salko

    Yes crosscut then rip if your using a bandsaw then plane one face and edge flat and square then resaw

    https://journeymansjournel.wordpress.com
    The Lost Scrolls of HANDWORK
    (Hand tool only woodworking magazine)

    #129932
    dborn
    Participant

    @dborn

    I use the band saw for ripping and pattern cutting and not cross cutting. I suppose you could cross cut with a band saw, but it’s very limiting in the depth of cut.. Table saw and miter saw are for cross cutting.

    Anyway, Paul uses a rip saw for cross cutting. To accomplish a smooth cross cut with a rip saw he first uses a knife wall. You’ll see that in every video he does, when he cross cuts. It seems contrary to what is put out by others on the internet, but it is what he does.

    #129933
    Salko Safic
    Participant

    @salko

    I didnt mean uaing a bandaaw for crosscutting or ripping I meant the order you use in handsawing but the latter for resawing

    https://journeymansjournel.wordpress.com
    The Lost Scrolls of HANDWORK
    (Hand tool only woodworking magazine)

    #129934
    dborn
    Participant

    @dborn

    I knew what you meant!

    I’m not sure, but I think for all of the recent project videos that have been produced have been done completely by hand, even the preparation of the stock.

    #129935
    Salko Safic
    Participant

    @salko

    Sorry my bad

    It doesn’t matter if it wasn’t and to be honest it is hard on the body and he is 65+

    https://journeymansjournel.wordpress.com
    The Lost Scrolls of HANDWORK
    (Hand tool only woodworking magazine)

    #129936
    gallarotti
    Participant

    @gallarotti

    Sorry I didn’t mean what I said as an insult to him. Just that when you have the convenience of a bandsaw everything will be more square and more precise, I think. After all even he said that in the next year he will introduce the use of the bandsaw in his classes and videos as well.
    Resawing my hand must make it really hard to achieve squareness, even after carefully planing, doesn’t it? After cutting to length, ripping to width and resawing there is very little left of the initial board to make reference to, isn’t there?

    #129937
    Salko Safic
    Participant

    @salko

    All I can suggest is practice but if your posture is wrong then practicing will not help. Do what makea your woodworking enjoyable to you.

    https://journeymansjournel.wordpress.com
    The Lost Scrolls of HANDWORK
    (Hand tool only woodworking magazine)

    #129940
    dborn
    Participant

    @dborn

    I just meant he proves that woodworking by hand is completely obtainable with out machines. Some-days, I wish I could kick the machine habit!! lol Because, I lost some weight and gained muscle by resawing and planning boards by hand. That and you’re more engaged with the craft.

    Anyway! I have a bad habit of getting off subject and I apologize for that. Afterall, it’s 0500 here in the States and I’ve been up all night.

    Cheers!!

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 6 months ago by dborn.
    #129943
    Salko Safic
    Participant

    @salko

    It’s all good Dborn I don’t take offence to anything but I do want to correct you on one thing though the frame saw was not just used solely for veneers but to resaw stock into thinner ones, this was common practice throughout the world as it is still today. That’s why if they could of had a thickness planer back then they would of found little use for it.

    https://journeymansjournel.wordpress.com
    The Lost Scrolls of HANDWORK
    (Hand tool only woodworking magazine)

    #129946
    jbthepp
    Member

    @jbthepp

    I remember Paul showing the technique that had been mentioned several times on the winding sticks video. I remember him sawing down the stock a little way then rotating it around to cut a little further. It seems he was wanting to ensure accuracy.

    I am always amazed with the confidence that Paul exhibits when sawing. So seeing him do that was interesting. I feel sure he has the skill to just go to town on a cut like that but I am assuming that even the best keep an eye on their cuts from time to time. Particularly on something that requires accuracy.

    #129953
    dborn
    Participant

    @dborn

    I think that Roubo frame saw, that so many built, is a novelty. Any rip saw will resaw lumber. Just wax the saw blade and go to town!

    The joiners of yester-year didn’t have electricity, so hard telling what they would and wouldn’t use, if the technology was available to them. It would be interesting to know what influence trade unions had on the work environment. Because a strong trade union would probably want to prevent any machine, that could potentially, replace a worker from the work place. Therefore not wanting that to use a thickness planer, if the technology existed. That’s just my opinion..

    #129957
    Salko Safic
    Participant

    @salko

    I believe in the mid 1800’s they did have a thickness planer it was huge and crude, it was the saw mills who had them and woodies for the first time were getting planed lumber. If it wasn’t so damn expensive I would get it myself.

    The frame saw wasn’t a novelty at the time it was part n parcel with the job but ofcourse I believe if they had a bandsaw they would use it. Henry Disston was the first man that introduced a bandsaw to America, I think he got it shipped from France but don’t quote me on this. When he brought it into his shop everyone was scared to use it lol

    https://journeymansjournel.wordpress.com
    The Lost Scrolls of HANDWORK
    (Hand tool only woodworking magazine)

    #129960
    charlesfwood3
    Participant

    @charlesfwood3

    He says it’s all you need because it’s all you need. And two saws is more than you need. You could do those three steps with a $30 26″ fat max from the box store. Hand saws can bind in the work and can get ruined so it doesn’t hurt to get some experience with a $30 saw.

    #129961
    George Bridgeman
    Participant

    @george

    I do all my resawing on my band saw. I would not be without it. Even in a small shop, it transformed my woodworking.

    Machines go back will before a lot of people think. Even in the third century there were water powered sawmills.

    George.

    "To know and not do is to not know"

    #129965
    Peter George
    Participant

    @pjgeorge

    I’ve used a number of methods for re-sawing. I have a 10 inch band saw that has a 4 1/2 inch capacity that I use for small projects. I’ve used the table saw for wider material. I also have a lunchbox style planer that sees some use. I also have a 6 inch benchtop jointer that hasn’t been used in about a year and a half (since I learned how to flatten a board with the hand planes.)

    My general work flow would be to flatten one face and square one edge. Cut to rough length and rip to width. Resaw if required. Flatten the second side, either by hand or with the planer. If I used the planer, I’ll use the smoothing plane to take the planer marks out. I’ll generally only use the planer if I need stock precisely to thickness. (It’s very loud and messy.)

    I don’t apologize for using machines for stock preparation. My shop time is limited and I would rather spend the time doing the fun stuff. I have learned how to do most of this by hand, but sometimes it’s worth it to let the machines do what they are good at.

    Peter in
    Biggar SK
    "New York is big, but this is Biggar"

Viewing 15 replies - 16 through 30 (of 39 total)

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