Viewing 9 posts - 46 through 54 (of 54 total)
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  • #25472
    Mark Armstrong
    Participant

    Thank guys the screw from my record spokeshave fit and I measured on my callipers as 3/16″ which is about what you said David in thousandths which is about 4.7mm . I have loads of 5mm machine screw different threads and just do not enter hole.
    Steve could you explain to me what a 10-24 is?
    Thanks

    Dagenham, Essex, England

    #25485
    Sandy
    Participant

    A no# 10 screw is .1875 but your TPI count is really course for a screw that small. I’d be more inclined to think you are looking for 10-24.

    Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.

    Albert Einstein

    #25486
    Steve Follis
    Participant

    It’s an imperial measure, below 1/4″ diameter, the diameter of the bolt is designated in a numerical value, rather than fractions. The numbers range from 12 to zero. The #10 has a diameter of 0.1900″ (4.8260mm). The thread count is 24 teeth per inch, with a pitch of 0.041667″ (1.0583mm). A 3/16″ bolt would be .1875″, very close to the .1900″ of the #10. If you look at the metric values it is very close to a M5-1.0.

    Hope that helps.

    Memphis, Tennessee

    #125271
    Augusto Campos
    Participant

    Well I made one.
    You can see it in http://wood.augcampos.pt

    Augusto Campos
    (Blog Das Madeiras)
    Site : http://woodworking.augcampos.pt
    Blog : http://woodworking.augcampos.pt/blog-posts
    Youtube : http://youtube.com/bdm_pt
    FaceBook : https://www.facebook.com/blogdasmadeiras
    Tumblr : https://blogdasmadeiras.tumblr.com
    Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/augcampos
    Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/blogdasmadeiras

    Attachments:
    #125779
    Steve Follis
    Participant

    Very Nice @augcampos! How does it work for you?

    Memphis, Tennessee

    #125839
    Augusto Campos
    Participant

    Hi there,
    The handle of the center is to use one-handed and two handles out is for use with both hands.
    To set the blade, it uses the wing nut on the back of the blade and define higth (Allan key).
    I have free sckechup plans http://wood.augcampos.pt site

    Augusto Campos
    (Blog Das Madeiras)
    Site : http://woodworking.augcampos.pt
    Blog : http://woodworking.augcampos.pt/blog-posts
    Youtube : http://youtube.com/bdm_pt
    FaceBook : https://www.facebook.com/blogdasmadeiras
    Tumblr : https://blogdasmadeiras.tumblr.com
    Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/augcampos
    Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/blogdasmadeiras

    #314273
    martijn
    Participant

    Excuse me for bumping up such an old topic, but I wasn’t sure if my question was important enough to open a new topic, since the conversation was already held here.

    I am also in the market for a router plane, and considering the prices of the secondhand #71’s on ebay, I might as well go for a new one.

    I am actually leaning towards the Lie-Nielsen one, except for the fact that the blades are quite expensive, and smaller sizes also require an adapter. I like that the handles are vertical and I also like the larger footprint.

    My main concern with the Veritas router is the angled handles and smaller footprint. Can anyone tell me whether the Veritas router is suitable for cleaning up tenons without the use of an added base? It seems to me that it is difficult to put enough downward pressure with the angled handles for the router to not tip over. Combined with the smaller footprint it looks less effective to me than the Lie-Nielsen.

    Thanks in advance!

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 1 month ago by martijn.
    #314278
    Derek Long
    Participant

    I’ve cleaned up pretty big tenons with the Veritas without a problem. Probably a little under 3″ or so, if I recall. If you need to clean up over 3″ you need to add a base, but that goes for LN’s and old 71’s, too. Basically the Veritas can handle just about any normal tenon size in hobby woodworking. I don’t think you can go wrong with LN, Veritas or an old 71.

    One thing I do like about the Veritas router plane is that the blades also fit in the medium router plane, for when you need a smaller router for hinges or whatever.

    Derek Long
    Denver, Colorado

    #314279
    Edmund
    Participant

    I haven’t used the LN, so I can’t speak to that, but don’t be concerned about force with the Veritas. I could easily bring [more force than should ever be applied in woodworking] through the Veritas, and it would not tip over. The splayed handles actually help with visibility if you have ham-sized fists like me, and Paul has used his Veritas many times in the videos, and I can’t recall ever seeing him tip it over. In fact, I’ve used mine for a while now, and never even felt tipping over was a reason for concern….I’m probably misunderstanding you, because I feel the router plane is about as stable as a tool can be.

    So the only issue, imo, is the extra inch or so of reach you’ll have out of the gate with the LN for working on longer tenons. The evaluation, it seems to me, is the additional cost of the LN vs the extra hassle involved in mounting a longer base plate to the Veritas (which only needs to be done once for the lifetime of the tool, as the longer base plate can then be left on forever, as Paul seems to have done with his 71).

    The cost, for me, is:
    whatever additional blades you need for the LN
    vs
    whatever additional blades you’ll want for the Veritas, plus the cost of buying or building a longer base for the Veritas, and “cost” includes any subjective “hassle factors”. FWIW, you can buy a 14″ long x 4″ wide x 3/8″ thick piece of nearly-perfectly flat+parallel aluminum for under 20 bucks on Amazon. A piece of similarly-sized, dried, quartersawn wood might be less expensive. That would give the Veritas greater reach than the LN by a considerable margin, or you could trim it down to your taste.

    If you don’t need any extra blades, or if the cost of the longer base is high for you, then the LN seems like the better buy. If you need a few blades, and the cost of the base is very low for you, then the Veritas is probably worth considering.

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