Screwed linseed finish

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Viewing 9 posts - 16 through 24 (of 24 total)
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  • #11343
    Kevin Broaddrick
    Participant

    Thank all of you for the great input. I am going to try the mineral spirit soak first, then sand, and finally reapply as many of you prescribe.  What a great forum to learn from the veterans!

    PS I will post some pics of the botched victims.

    #11390
    Kevin Broaddrick
    Participant

    Here are pictures. Looks like a “do over” is in order.

    #25665
    Peter George
    Participant

    I’ve had great success with the Tried and True varnish oil. It’s BLO with a natural resin (varnish) added. The secret is very thin coats, allowed to dry overnight and at least three coats.

    I’ve also used it to finish turnings on the lathe. In this case I again apply a thin coat and use friction to heat the finish, causing it to cure very rapidly.

    Here is a link to their web site: http://www.triedandtruewoodfinish.com/products.html

    I think the secret is to find a finish that you like and then use it long enough to learn how to use it to it’s best advantage.

    Peter in
    Biggar SK
    "New York is big, but this is Biggar"

    #27233
    derek.eder
    Participant

    An old Swedish saying goes “if you start working with 1 liter of linseed oil, you should end up with 2!”

    In other words, apply very sparingly.

    #27922
    Zachary Mays
    Participant

    I know this is an old thread but wanted to throw in my opinion/experience with Linseed Oil Finishing anyway as there appears to be an enormous amount of misinformation on the subject.
    The first question I have for anyone who has problems with botched boiled linseed oil (BLO) finishes is simply what are you really applying?
    The BLO you can buy for $6-$10 a quart in big box stores is actually raw linseed oil (better described as flaxseed oil) mixed with heavy metal driers and solvents to “boil” or polymerize the oil. Chemical and metal based driers are far less expensive than thermally treating the raw oil thus reducing the overall production process and increasing profits for the manufacturer. If you are using this type of BLO I can’t help you very much because after reading the MSDS I didn’t want it in my home.
    What I see most commonly referred to as BLO are premixed Linseed oil finishes which advertise the ability to achieve a hand rubbed finish in one coat. Virtually all of these products are a combination of solvents, chemically modified raw linseed oil and evaporative drying polyurethane. I have limited experience with these but have achieved good results in the past but discontinued using them after review of the MSDS.
    Finally there is true thermally modified linseed oil. In the US there are few sources for it but it shares nothing in common with the above mentioned forms of BLO other than the name. First and foremost when you pour this stuff out of the bottle it has a consistency somewhere between that of molasses and motor oil depending on the temperature in the room.
    Secondly it should smell like a natural product not a chemical plant.
    Applying coats is very different than a varnish, by varnish I mean any finish that contains a color solvent and resin. It soaks into the wood much deeper and drys very slowly, 3-7 days at best. It doesn’t really get tacky like a resin based finish will making it very forgiving and easy to work with. My typical coat involves drenching the piece for several hours adding more to any section that fully absorbed the oil and appears dry. At this point I wipe it off and let the piece sit for several days. I typically wipe the excess off with a paper towel and spread it out next to the piece. As they are both wood based products they react to the oil in similar fashions so the paper towel can be used as a gauge for the wood. Once the paper towel gets stiff and dry it is safe to assume the oil in the wood is in a similar state. You will also see small spots form on the surface where the wood is saturated and excess oil is forced out. To remove these fro. The surface I just scrub at them with a fine abrasives pad or metal wool, steel or bronze. I finished a large hard maple, Mahogany and walnut with organic BLO using this process and after repeating the process 3 times all of the pores in the wood had been filled in and a nice film had developed on the surface.

    I regularly use Boiled Linseed Oil on projects and it has quickly become the only oil I will apply to cutting boards.

    It also does wonders for bringing the wood in antiques back to life and I regularly will apply a coat of oil to a piece to bring out the figure and color in the wood then apply 2-3 coats of long oil varnish as a more protective top coat.

    #42340
    sidreilley
    Participant

    Interesting comment Zachary, I remember hearing the same thing a few years ago from a stocker. He suggested getting raw linseed oil and cooking it yourself. My question is where does one get the pure linseed oil to start with? Where do you get your BLO?

    Cheers

    #42470
    Ron Harper
    Participant

    I use a shop finish for a lot of things including furniture.. I got it from the Old Tools List on the net 25 years ago. I understand it is also the first phase of a finish that Sam Maloof used on everything. I part boiled linseed oil I part turpentine, 1 part varathane varnish.. All done with of rags. Generous first coat leave on 25 minutes. Wipe of completely. wait 24 hours lighter coat leave on ten minutes. Wipe off completely. I keep this up till I like the look. Then I let it set for three days and apply a good coat of paste wax and let dry then buff out. RAGS MUST BE DISPOSED OF PROPERlY. Can spontaneously combust

    #43242
    Zachary Mays
    Participant

    I get all my Linseed oil products from http://www.solventfreepaint.com

    In addition to their raw and boiled linseed oils I’ve used their linseed oil soap, which amazed me no matter what I tried it on, and the Raw Linseed Oil Beeswax, works great as a “top coat” on cutting boards.

    #43417
    sidreilley
    Participant

    Zachary, thanks very much indeed for the info., I will give them a try today as I have several projects in need of finish. I’ve always preferred a finish “in the wood” vice “on the wood”.

    Cheers

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