Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
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  • #140101
    Reno
    Participant

    This is a “fair use” copy of an image from a Tage Frid article, showing his shop-made sliding dovetail saw.

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    #140133
    David R.
    Participant

    Hi Reno,

    I don’t want to offend, but I’m pretty sure, this is a standard German (I imagine it says “Made in Germany” on the body) Gratsäge (saw) and a Grathobel (plane). Compare it to the one you can see here (http://ecemmerich.de/gesamtkatalog/) on page 28 (saw) and 11 (plane) or here: https://www.agrotinas.de/shop/articleimg.aspx?wg=4000&article=HB-0151&imgpos=3944 or just do an image search on google on “Gratsäge” or “Grathobel”. Also check out this video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_GzfKY_bc6g), part 3 on a small series on these tools.

    Best regards,
    David

    from Germany

    #140138
    Matt McGrane
    Participant

    That saw looks like what is called a “kerfing plane” or “kerfing saw” that is used to make a saw kerf in an edge of a board (around all four edges) before using another saw to resaw thin pieces. However the kerfing saws typically have a fence of some kind so that the distance of the saw blade to the edge is consistent.

    Matt, Northern California - Started a blog in 2016: http://tinyshopww.blogspot.com/

    #140142
    Ed
    Participant

    It’s a stair saw. Frid explains how he uses it to cut sliding dovetails in his book. It has been awhile since I looked at it, but I think he explains how to make a stair saw if you don’t want to buy one like the one @davidr shows. Frid uses a dovetail plane, which is probably what is in the photo, to cut the male part of the joint.

    #140232
    Reno
    Participant

    What distinguishes the sliding dovetail saw from most stair saws is the bevel on the sides, which supports the angled cut of the dovetail.

    Traditionalwoodworker.com sells the E.C. Emmerich saws for those unwilling to make their own.

    #140807
    Reno
    Participant

    Here’s my version of a sliding dovetail saw. The dozuki blade cuts on the pull stroke and can be raised or lowered. There is a substantial post on the side which helps push the saw against a fence that establishes the cut angle (I am left-handed).

    20160923_082655

    There is a lot of surface area to ensure contact with the fence.

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