Small cabinet for the kitchen

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 18 total)
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  • #123601
    emilio.remogna
    Participant

    Hello,

    I’ve started a new project: a small cabinet for the kitchen.

    I’ve never made a cabinet before, so this project gives me the opportunity to learn and test new techniques and – I hope – to acquire some skill in furniture making.

    [ Maybe it would be more correct to say that this project is an error-prone experiment I’d like to share with you… 🙂 ]

    Image #1: a very “minimalistic” wireframe of the cabinet.

    Images #2, #3: front and rear frames.

    Image #4: chopping mortises; I used two guides to tightly hold the piece in the vise jaws.

    Have a nice day!

    #123606
    Salko Safic
    Participant

    Congrats

    I like your LN 4 1/2

    https://journeymansjournel.wordpress.com
    The Lost Scrolls of HANDWORK
    (Hand tool only woodworking magazine)

    #123607
    emilio.remogna
    Participant

    Hi Salko, thank you!

    Actually the smoothing plane is a DICK #4 smoothing plane: http://www.mehr-als-werkzeug.de/category/DICK-Hobel-3581_3593.htm
    It works very well and the price is affordable.
    LN tools are still a dream for me…

    #123608
    Derek Long
    Participant

    I’ve never heard of Dick planes (Dictum). I looked them up, seems they might be a good option for our European friends here on Masterclasses. They’re based on the Bedrock, like LN planes, but a lot cheaper.

    How’s the fit and finish of those planes?

    Derek Long
    Denver, Colorado

    #123610
    emilio.remogna
    Participant

    Hi delong1974,

    I personally find the DICK #4 smoothing plane very comfortable and solid.
    No problems with blade adjustment as well.
    It works very well and it produces good results – obviously according to my experience -. I used it with spruce, pine and oak.
    I think I’ll buy the #5 too.

    #123611
    chemical_cake
    Participant

    The drawing doesn’t give much away does it! At least it won’t spoil the surprise when you post the finished project. Your joinery looks good so far.

    Is that all you’re working from? I’ve just finished reading all of the Krenov stuff and he didn’t like to work from drawings, so you’re in good company, but I’m completely the opposite. If I don’t work everything out on paper beforehand I screw up.

    As one of WWMC’s “European friends”, I would also like to know what you think of the Dick planes. They look to be a more reasonable price, and I could do with a reliably flat #5. I see they have wisely left the name off the lever cap.

    Matt

    Southampton, UK

    #123612
    chemical_cake
    Participant

    Ignore that last bit, you posted while I was typing.

    Southampton, UK

    #123623
    Salko Safic
    Participant

    I have noticed more and more planes replicate LN ones some good and some as my friend and dealer said are good for door stops. LN tried once to put a stop to it but was quickly reminded that they too are replicators of Stanley. In looks these Dick planes are identical to the LN versions and if they are truly flat and everything is as they claim in their advertising then forget dreaming about owning an LN plane since you have one right now. As for the price difference it depends in which country you reside in. Once the conversion is calculated it may or may not work out cheaper than the LN planes.

    I think if you have the know how it’s better to restore a decent old relic than spending a fortune like I have on premium planes but I have also seen very nice antique planes unrestored go for a lot more than the premium stuff.

    German tools are very good I’ll never forget the futuristic looking moulding planes with interchangeable soles they once made. It was a brilliant idea but the price tag from memory was well over $3000, I wonder if they knew why people never bought them. I also love their so called tablesaw, completely hand powered handsaw in built. You just slide it over the timber a couple of times and you have this pristine very straight cut, again very expensive.

    https://journeymansjournel.wordpress.com
    The Lost Scrolls of HANDWORK
    (Hand tool only woodworking magazine)

    #123660
    emilio.remogna
    Participant

    @Matthew: I also have some sketches for the main parts! 😀 They help me to “visualize” and solve some problems (i.e. mating tenons).
    That wireframe has the only purpose to show how I’m building the frame!
    Generally speaking, I have to admit I’m not a die-hard fan of drawing…
    I’m… “in between”. 🙂
    But I think your approach is for sure more correct than mine. If you draw all parts and how they fit together, you have, in practice, a clear and precise handbook!



    @Salko
    : the plane is ok and it’s flat. * IMO * it’s a good plane.
    Unfortunately I cannot make a comparison with an LN, but I think DICK planes are a good starting point.

    #123661
    emilio.remogna
    Participant

    Some updates.

    Side rails are now squared and I’ve cut the grooves.

    It’s time for tenons, now!

    #125069
    fudoka
    Participant

    How are you intending to join the various panels together to make the finished cabinet, screws?

    #126540
    emilio.remogna
    Participant

    Hello,
    I had enough time these days to continue my small (super-overdue) project. So… just a small update.
    Panels are MDF (6mm), because I’d like to paint them with some kind of artistic effect (maybe I’ll use acrylic plaster – see attachments for an example).



    @fudoka
    : I’m so sorry for my late reply: grooves are used to house the panels.

    #126546
    Matt McGrane
    Participant

    Looking good, Emelio. That’s going to be one neat looking cabinet.

    Matt, Northern California - Started a blog in 2016: http://tinyshopww.blogspot.com/

    #126547
    Joel Finkel
    Participant

    Thanks for sharing this. Looking good. I love the idea of the painted panels.

    North side of Chicago. -- "Such a long, long time to be gone; such a short time to be there."

    #126956
    emilio.remogna
    Participant

    Thank you Matt. Thank you Joel.

    Painted panels are now finished. It’s a very simple effect, but I think it’s ok.

    I used a very simple technique to make that relief texture: just pressed a crushed aluminium foil on the fresh primer and let the primer dry.

    I then used acrylic green and gold to paint the surface.

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