Stanley Router Plane #71 1/2

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  • #137064
    David B
    Participant

    I finally managed to snag one off eBay. They can get expensive but I was determined to get one for my shop (nothing against my Poor Man’s Router!). I’m not sure if I would have preferred the #71 with an open throat vs. the 71 1/2 but I really like how this came out. The sole is perfectly flat, I’ve sharpened and polished the iron and the rust has been removed.

    Attachments:
    #137070
    Derek Long
    Participant

    Wow, you really caught a winner. That’s a nice looking router plane.

    Derek Long
    Denver, Colorado

    #137075
    Marcus L
    Participant

    What did you use to get the rust off? I’m curious about how you removed the rust from the top where the writing is. Did you use a vinegar bath?

    #137088
    Alan
    Participant

    That looks really nice David. I wondered what they would come up like.
    (better not show your photos on eBay – or they’ll be back up to £120 again)

    I deliberated over whether to get an open or closed throat. The one I have is open and has a ‘shoe’ to prevent it from tipping forward. This is fiddly to set.
    I now use a closed hardwood sole.
    I don’t think you’ve lost any functionality, you’ve gained rigidity and ease-of-use.

    #137089
    charlesfchambers
    Participant

    @blackdiamond2
    Apologies for jumping in, but I thought I share my rust removal process with a before and after. I only have pics from a wartime No 7 but rust is rust and japanning is jappaning right?
    My process is this: Soak the tool and other rusty parts in Evapo Rust until the rust is gone. Usually overnight.
    Then dry it off and wipe it down with some 3 in 1 oil.
    For a long plane like the number 7, I used a plastic window planter box. Make sure the tool is completely covered, otherwise there will be an unsightly line.
    Evapo Rust isn’t as cheap as vinegar, but it works significantly better, and it’s safe for paint and people and eco friendly.
    Note that I did not do anything other than my process outlined above.

    Attachments:
    #137098
    David B
    Participant

    Getting the rust off was a bit of elbow grease for the most part. I did try soaking the plane in some rust removing product for a bit and then scrubbed it with a brass brush but that really had limited impact. I used a lot of sandpaper to clean the whole plane. Lastly, I used a metal brush/wheel on my grinder wheel (not the grinder attachment) which helped get into the little crevices and whatnot.

    I got it down to this level of cleaned-up but decided I wanted to put on some paint to make it look a bit fresher so I taped the whole thing up and sprayed some RustOleum over the top. Once it dried I sanded down the paint off of the raised letters. I’m not sure if this is how it is “supposed” to look but I kind of liked the final product.

    More importantly, it works great!

    • This reply was modified 6 years, 7 months ago by David B.
    • This reply was modified 6 years, 7 months ago by David B.
    Attachments:
    #137105
    charlesfchambers
    Participant

    @dbockel2
    Stanley finishing dept. could have learned something from you. Much more elegant than the original!

    #137164
    STEVE MASSIE
    Participant

    You did a nice job on this, I really like the Stanley 71 and 71 1/2 routers. One of mine is an earlier version which had no adjustment wheel and is a bit finicky but works fine. I was recently given one with the adjustment wheel and it works great. I haven’t done it yet but am going to add a board on the bottom like Paul’s.

    Steve

    Steve Massie, I live in the great State of Florida, US

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