Travelling Joiners Toolbox Progress so far

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Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 30 total)
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  • #697960
    Debra J
    Participant

    Nice toolbox! I’m impressed with the local wood. Where did you get it?

    - Debra J

    #698153
    philip higgins
    Participant

    Thanks Deb
    I am in Melbourne and get it from local timber recyclers and suppliers. Are you in Australia. I have tried quite a few local timbers but they are very hard so hard on tools and wont compress so errors show up easily much to my woodworking shame🙂
    they are all variations on tassie oak or gums
    Happy to answer any questions

    #698155
    philip higgins
    Participant

    drawers are in and hardware fitted. Now just take apart and final scraping and sanding and the always scary application of finish. I can see all the little errors i made but overall pretty proud of this project 😎

    #698178
    Darren
    Participant

    That looks absolutely amazing, well done!

    #698235
    Sven-Olof Jansson
    Participant

    Hej Philip,

    Indeed very nice, and many thanks for sharing your progress.

    There are those who suggest that when half pins of a drawer back form the upper rear end of the sides, then these should be bevelled a little to prevent spelching of the corners. Just a thought.

    Sven-Olof Jansson
    London, UK; Boston, MA

    #698236
    philip higgins
    Participant

    Darren and Sven
    Thankyou very much and Sven that is a great suggestion i was thinking how to best finish the drawers and also if i would use 2 small handles like Paul did or a matched recess at the bottom of the top drawer and top of the bottom drawer.
    I made the drawers a little deeper so dont have much room at the front so recess is my likely answer.
    Phil

    #698270
    Debra J
    Participant

    Tight-looking tails on those drawers. This is a great-looking build. Is it a challenging project?

    - Debra J

    #698336
    philip higgins
    Participant

    Darren and Sven
    Thankyou very much and Sven that is a great suggestion i was thinking how to best finish the drawers and also if i would use 2 small handles like Paul did or a matched recess

    Tight-looking tails on those drawers. This is a great-looking build. Is it a challenging project?

    Debra
    It was a challenging project for me but i find if you take your time and be kind to yourself about mistakes and use them to always aim for a higher standard then it is all achievable.
    The the most daunting thing for me was the pyramid raised panels but it wasnt as difficult as i thought.
    If you take it on feel free to ask questions and share progress and as you can see people are very helpful and supportive.
    Happy woodworking
    Phil

    #698552
    philip higgins
    Participant

    All done

    #698554
    philip higgins
    Participant

    all done 2

    #698574
    Debra J
    Participant

    Thanks Deb
    I am in Melbourne and get it from local timber recyclers and suppliers. Are you in Australia. I have tried quite a few local timbers but they are very hard so hard on tools and wont compress so errors show up easily much to my woodworking shame🙂
    they are all variations on tassie oak or gums
    Happy to answer any questions

    Not in Australia but in TX USA. Someone way back decided “Australian Pine” would make a great windbreak between fields and now it’s become invasive. What can you use it for? It has a nice light color but has really big open pores.

    - Debra J

    #698579
    Larry Geib
    Participant

    Australian Cypress

    I presume that’s the species you are talking about. It’s actually a false cypress. The database says it’s good for flooring and light furniture and building construction. It’s highly rot and bug resistant, so maybe decking. And it’s among the harder softwoods, comparable to yew.
    It apparently goes by Australian cypress pine. Sounds like it might make good siding as well.

    I had to double check to make sure you didn’t write Austrian pine ( Pinus nigra) 🙂

    • This reply was modified 8 months ago by Larry Geib.
    • This reply was modified 8 months ago by Larry Geib.
    • This reply was modified 8 months ago by Larry Geib.
    #698584
    Larry Geib
    Participant

    Some USDA info on its introduction and invasiveness.

    http://www.tsusinvasives.org/home/database/casuarina-equisetifolia

    Sounds nasty to get rid of.

    #698601
    philip higgins
    Participant

    Thanks Deb
    I am in Melbourne and get it from local timber recyclers and suppliers. Are you in Australia. I have tried quite a few local timbers but they are very hard so hard on tools and wont compress so errors show up easily much to my woodworking shame🙂
    they are all variations on tassie oak or gums
    Happy to answer any questions

    Not in Australia but in TX USA. Someone way back decided “Australian Pine” would make a great windbreak between fields and now it’s become invasive. What can you use it for? It has a nice light color but has really big open pores.

    Debra
    As Larry said it is ideal for fences and outdoor furniture and decking.
    I made this garden bench from Pauls design out of Cypress Pine

    #698638
    Sven-Olof Jansson
    Participant

    Please forgive me for being a nit-picker, but Australian Cypress (Callitris columellaris), is not the same as Australian Pine (Casuarina equisetifolia). The latter appears to have few other uses than that of being a popular bonzai tree. It’s a “she-oak”, not a conifer (i.e. making it a hardwood); a designation that is completely lost on me, as Australian Pine trees carry both female and male flowers.

    Beeches, at least the European ones (Fagus Sylvatica), have the same approach to competition as Australian Pine. Little else grows under the canopies of beech forests. They, just like Australian Pine and the favourite wood Black Walnut (Juglans nigra), use chemical warfare (allelopathy) to suppress all else growing. The Australian Pine is frugal while beech is fastidious, which makes the former a nuisance best rid of.

    Sven-Olof Jansson
    London, UK; Boston, MA

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