Tyzack Plastic handled tenon/back saw

Welcome! Forums General Woodworking Discussions Tools and Tool Maintenance/Restoration Tyzack Plastic handled tenon/back saw

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #138404
    cobhhive
    Participant

    Hi everyone. My first time in this forum. I’ve been woodworking on and off for most of my life, most of it fairly basic and I’ve enjoyed it in varying degrees. I just recently found Paul Sellers and this site and have been reinvigorated. I now have far more confidence to try things that I’ve never contemplated being able to do and try again the things I’ve failed at in the past.

    Anyway:

    I have a plastic handled tyzack saw that my late father bought (I’m guessing) in the seventies or early eighties. It’s got a brass back and a plain blade and cuts nicely. I liked this saw as a teenager and even liked its comfortable and roomy handle. Unfortunately the handle is very slightly loose and seems to be held on with roll pins in blind holes. I’d like to tighten it up but have no idea how to without damaging the handle.

    Any ideas or experience of this type of fixing?

    Thanks, Daithí.

    #138411
    STEVE MASSIE
    Participant

    Welcome to the forum, this is a great place to hang out and like you I have learned so much from and his team. Paul is truly a Craftsman and very generous with his experience and knowledge, Paul’s son Joseph and fellow worker Phil are great as well and very helpful.

    As far as your saw goes I personally do not like plastic to slippery in my opinion. Having said that I would make a new handle out of a nice hardwood and buy aftermarket saw nuts or buy an old cheap saw and use those.

    Steve

    Steve Massie, I live in the great State of Florida, US

    #138436
    Alan
    Participant

    I too might do as Steve suggests – replacing the handle with a wooden one.

    If you want to keep it as it is, because you find the handle comfortable and that’s how your father bought it, I’d first try tapping the roll-pins in a little further using a nail-punch. They’re blind holes (don’t go all the way through) so the roll-pins probably only have a small degree of purchase once they pass through the saw blade.

    Failing that, I’d use a very small drill to bore a hole through the centre of each roll-pin, coming out the other side, to indicate their locations. Then knock them out with a nail-punch and replace them with larger roll-pins or even saw nuts.

    You could also drill a couple of new holes and add more pins.

    #138448
    Matt McGrane
    Participant

    Welcome to the forum, Daithi. Clearly that saw was designed never to be able to remove/replace the handle. Sounds like a horrible design to me. I like Alan’s suggestion – I had no idea how I might remove the handle when the pins are pun in to stopped holes.

    I’ve had a couple saws with loose handles and have used shims in the holes to fix them. On one I used the metal from a soda can as the shim material; on the other I bought plastic tubing and had to modify it a little to shim the space between saw bolt and blade hole.

    Matt, Northern California - Started a blog in 2016: http://tinyshopww.blogspot.com/

    #138482
    cobhhive
    Participant

    Thanks for the replies. It’s very much appreciated. Thanks Matt, it does seem at least like an unusual way to attach a saw handle! I suppose I was wondering about the engineering side of the design. It does seem like a good way to make sure that the holes in the blade are filled by the retainers and the saw is rock solid that way ie: the handle doesn’t rock up and down. I can’t figure out how it was meant to clamp the blade in the handle though and that’s where it’s loose; side to side. Without taking it apart I don’t know if the pins go into the handle on the other side of the blade plate.
    Thanks also Alan, I did try drving the pins in more and stopped myself for that reason; was I likely to drive the handle apart if the pins were all the way to the bottom of their holes. Mentioning shims though has given me an idea to try shiming between the blade and handle. I would prefer to keep the plastic and I’ve found it more comfortable than some of the wooden ones that I’ve used but I suppose I’d also prefer a saw that works too.
    I’ll keep you posted. It might be some use to someone else who has one of these apparently odd tools!

    Attachments:
    #138517
    Alan
    Participant

    Hi Daithi,

    Thanks for the pictures. Now we’re all singing from the same hymn-sheet!

    You have no clamping forces acting on the saw plate.
    The roll-pins purely prevented up & down wobble and prevent the handle from falling off.
    The pins almost certainly were meant to go through the saw plate and into a recess on the other side., but re-locating them now won’t solve your sideways wobble.

    Remove the roll-pins altogether. They’re not doing what you need now.
    Drill the plastic carefully (hand drill) then nail-punch the roll-pins out from the rear.
    Drill a new, slightly larger, clean hole, all the way through the handle, the saw plate, and through the handle the other side.
    Fit bolts to the exact diameter of your new holes with nuts on the other side.
    That’ll keep the handle attached, prevent up & down movement, and clamp the handle firmly against the plate, preventing any sideways wobble.

    If you don’t want to use regular nuts & bolts, take a look at the type used on self-assembly kitchen cupboards. These are similar to saw-nuts, but narrower. They’re strong enough to clamp two adjacent kitchen cupboards together and have pan-heads at each end which won’t look out of place on your saw.

    I tried attaching images, but it does’t appear to have worked. Here’s a link:
    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Connecting-Screws-Bolts-Kitchen-Cabinet-Furniture-Connectors-5mm-diameter-/322179620461

    bolt

    • This reply was modified 6 years, 4 months ago by Alan.
    • This reply was modified 6 years, 4 months ago by Alan.
    Attachments:
    #138522
    Alan
    Participant

    I wonder if that Tyzack name is the same one in ‘W.Tyzack & Turner’, purveyors of fine saws with beautifully hand-crafted wooden handles?
    If ol’ Mr.Tyzack were around today to see what they’re producing in his name!

    #138530
    cobhhive
    Participant

    I wonder if that Tyzack name is the same one in ‘W.Tyzack & Turner’, purveyors of fine saws with beautifully hand-crafted wooden handles?
    If ol’ Mr.Tyzack were around today to see what they’re producing in his name!

    Ha ha. It would be interesting to see if he’d continue to make very expensive hand made tools or if he’d bow to the pressure (or be pleased) to go with mass manufacuturing (if he were still around). I know I’m glad, to a certain extent, that I’m able to afford the mass produced things that if they were hand made would be way out of my means.

    Thanks for the idea for bolts. I actually have a few around in one of my junk boxes.
    I suppose I posted about this saw because I was interested in the way it was made/put together. It occured to me that maybe the handle was moulded to the blade? In two pieces perhaps with the roll pins just to locate one half and then the two halves bonded together.
    I have another saw which had a really horrible plastic handle that I hated. I removed it to find that the blade had pieces of tubing welded into it that the saw bolts passed through. The only ways it could have been made was to mould it on or have two halves stuck together.
    Perhaps this tyzack was one of these experimental methods?

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.