Wall fixing method

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  • #310972
    Darren
    Participant

    Hi,

    Is a French cleat strong enough to hold this on a wall?

    Regards

    Darren.

    #310980
    deanbecker
    Participant

    There are a couple videos and plans for a stand for the cabinet . I think it is just below the drawers.although it is a stand alone project , not part of the shelf unit.
    If you cannot locate the bracketgo ahead and build a bottom unit to stack it on , this will give you reason to buy more neat tools
    Congradulations on finishing the cabinet

    #312201
    Thomas Angle
    Participant

    I used a french cleat for my cabinet. Actually I put two of them on the cabinet because I was a little worried about it holding the weight. Not sure why, because I can hang on the cleat without a problem and I go about 215 lbs. I did use 2 1/2″ decking screws and I used some scrap maple flooring for the cleat.

    Arbovale, WV

    Proverbs 18:13
    13 He that answereth a matter before he heareth it, it is folly and shame unto him.

    #334588
    Terry Gandy
    Participant

    If you use cabinet screws (used to mount cabinets) and screw them into studs, a french cleat will work just fine.

    #334627
    Larry Geib
    Participant

    The cabinet screws you use and making sure you get studs is the most important thing.

    I once did a major remodel and had a cabinet maker friend install some cabinets with French cleats and he used 3” drywall screws, which are usually case hardened. Everything went fine for about about 10 years. Then they all sheared off at once and the cabinet landed on the counter, miraculously just landing on some cutting boards with no damage to anything except a couple broken plates.
    The cabinet and contents probably weighed 300 lbs.

    I went out and bought rated screws ( Simpson, I think)

    He went and checked some other installs.

    #487054
    dunnison
    Participant

    Made and used ‘Wooden Wall Brackets’ per Paul’s instructions.

    In fact, made two sizes – see pic.

    In addition, put screws through the back frame (inside cabinet). Since the frame is screwed and glued to the sides/top/bottom of the cabinet, the brackets are probably not actually required, but they look way better.

    #552710
    karol
    Participant

    Hello, may I trouble anyone to publish a picture or two or other links where I could see the brackets actually used/ mounted – preferably in an interior of a house or apartment. Those published so far were placed on a surface of a workbench or so, though they look great. I made 10 of them, found them very very handy but used them in our barn only to support shelfs for hoard of things… As for their usage in a our interior, well I did not get approval (from my Mrs.) as they might have not looked fancy enough… :/ many thanks.

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 1 month ago by karol.
    #552711
    karol
    Participant

    test

    #552716
    skeeball
    Participant

    If you used for the wall cleat a 1 x 3 long enough to catch 3 studs, 2 screws at each stud, if each screw could hold 100 lb. that would 600 lb. Now if you only used 1 screw per stud that would still be 300 lb.
    While many may say this is way overkill the financial cost is not that much more but a whole lot of piece of mind.
    Then again you could go crazy and use a 1 x 10 or 1 x 12 and 4 or 5 screws per stud.

    #552718
    Larry Geib
    Participant

    I once did a major remodel and had a cabinet maker friend install some cabinets with French cleats and he used 3” drywall screws, which are usually case hardened. Everything went fine for about about 10 years. Then they e all sheared off at once and the cabinet landed on the counter, miraculously just landing on some cutting boards with no damage to anything except a couple broken plates.

    Haha. dejavú.

    I did exactly the Same thing with the same result after a 6 foot run of upper cabinets stood for 13 years. I was eating breakfast. The falling cabinets were cushioned by some flour storage tins on the counter which came out worse for the wear. No plates were lost but the sheared off drywall screws were a bit disconcerting. The replacements were also rated Simpson screws in the rest of the kitchen as well. I managed to rehang them in only a couple hours, and the only other fix needed was a scratch fix pen and some buffing.

    My cabinet maker friend, bless him, contracted all his kitchen owners ( about 150 of them), and re-hung all of them that were done with those screws.

    It’s actually the second kitchen uppers that fell off a house I owned. In a previous house the old steel cabinets were fastened by somebody into 150 year old brick and the anchors pulled out of the brick after we had lived there a few years (Soft low temperature fired “salmon” brick, as it turned out)
    We were on a trip I had college girls looking after the cat and house and they fell off the wall while we were gone and there was apparently some ground tremor. Thankfully, no one was hurt.

    Those old metal 1930’s cabinets ( we were in the planning stages of a new kitchen) were replaced by cherry cabinets in the whole kitchen. My wife was happy. My pocket book suffered.

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