Warrantied Superior Saw Sharpening

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  • #128453
    flametamer
    Participant

    I have a warrantied superior 5 TPI (I assume) saw that I have tried to re-sharpen after hitting something metal (not sure where) and have use two different file. One say to use a 7″ regular taper for 5 PPI and the other says to use a 7″ regular file 5 TPI. Since I am venturing into the world of re-sharpening my own saws does anyone have a better guide to use on which file should be used on which saw? Its a rip cut file and I have made a jib to hold my bastard file 90 degrees to the plate to joint the tops but I am not able to get a decent cutting edge on the saw. I am also wanting to reset the rake to a more shallow cut instead of the sloppy cut I am getting.

    #128455
    Craig
    Participant
    #128476
    Matt McGrane
    Participant

    Flame, there is a general rule about saw files that the width of the file should be a bit more than twice the height of a saw tooth. This is because you will get more life from the file.

    Each time you file with one if the three sides of the triangular file, less than half a flat side should file the back of one tooth while the adjoining flat side of the file will be filing the front of the prior tooth. When those two “half-flats” are worn out, you can turn the file to the next two flats and keep going. That’s hard to put into works, so I hope it was clear.

    There is an incredible saw filing video on youtube by Andy Lovelock. He is also on Lumberjocks.com under the name of “Brit”. The video lasts two hours, but is well worth it. In the very end of the video, he goes over some file sizing and recommends a 7″ regular taper for saws with 4 to 5.5 ppi. I can see the table I made from notes of Andy’s video match exactly that table of tpi/ppi that are shown in the “Vintage Saws” link that Craig gave you above.

    Be prepared for a learning curve. I don’t know if I’m bad or good at sharpening because I don’t have anything to compare to. I know for certain that I take MANY MANY more strokes to cut through a board than Paul does. But I know I’ll get better the more I do it.

    Let us know how you make out.

    Matt, Northern California - Started a blog in 2016: http://tinyshopww.blogspot.com/

    #128479
    flametamer
    Participant

    Thanks for all the suggestions I will be watching and reading for a while since I got hurt and can do nothing else but lay in bed watching videos and reading different approaches. I am struggling to remain here since its my back hurt because I really want to get out into the shop and do something even if its just sitting there looking at my tools but I can not remain in a seated position for more than a few minutes. I hope more post with ideas so that I can stay occupied during my recovery time even if it requires I need surgery to repair the damage.

    #128544
    ehisey
    Participant

    Paul’s saw video is a great place to start with both the why and the how. There is also a one on recutting teeth of badly damaged saws that I am following now to retooth an old abused backsaw.

    I hear you on the back injuries. Take care of it proper, an soak up videos to apply when you can sit comfortably.

    Tuscloosa, Alabama
    Lung T'an Hu Huesh Kung-fu Woodshop

    #128553
    Matt McGrane
    Participant

    Sorry to hear about the back, Flame. Hope it gets better soon and completely.

    In the mean time you can do some research. And if it’s sitting that’s a problem, then maybe it’s not that much of a problem for woodworking – most of my work is done standing. My feet are usually killing at the end of each day. I guess if it’s not one thing, it’s another.

    Matt, Northern California - Started a blog in 2016: http://tinyshopww.blogspot.com/

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