Wood resin causes my plane to get tacky, any tips to prevent this?

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  • #136088
    Igor Kerstges
    Participant

    Hiall!

    Finally I have started my own workbench-build. For this workbench, I have bought douglas fir. I was able to buy at a sell-out (the company being taken-over by a competitor) and on top of that, the lumper was prized wrongly (to my advantage). Still, it was clear to me that I was up for some challenges..

    The wood is finger-jointed to length and although nicely straight, it contains quite some knots and the corners have been rounded by about 3 milimeter. It also contains pretty deep machine marks with engraved characters and numerals. So I have to pay special attention to keep the plane nice and sharp.

    What I did not anticipate is how much resin comes out during planing, especially from the knotted areas! The resin causes quite some problems as it sticks to the sole of my plane no matter how much I prepare my plane, I have tried regular oiling and also waxing, but the plane keeps getting tacky and this is not only causing a lot of friction but also the shavings tend to stick regularly and these are then hard to remove.

    Those interruptions are pretty ‘unpleasant’, so I hope any of you might have some tips or clues how I could improve this situation?

    Thanks, cheers, Igor

    (PS: photo’s of my bench build will be attached in next days to a separate post on the projects forum)

    • This topic was modified 6 years, 8 months ago by Igor Kerstges.
    #136097
    BrianJ
    Participant

    Just a thought, perhapa blotting the resinous areas with turpentine / paint thinner before planing may help. (I thought there was some history on ths somewhere, i will post if i can find it.)
    BrianJ

    Ontario, Canada

    #136098
    BrianJ
    Participant

    Just a thought, perhaps blotting the resinous areas with turpentine / paint thinner before planing may help. (I thought there was some history on ths somewhere, i will post if i can find it.)
    BrianJ

    Ontario, Canada

    #136100
    Craig
    Participant

    Igor,
    Pitch/ resin is a problem in some woods and generally is dealt with by the lumber producer—-not always successfully.
    Here’s one source of information from a producer:
    http://www.woodbusiness.ca/sawmilling/setting-pitch
    You can try wiping with mineral spirits ( least stinky alternative). Observe good fire safety and ventilation practices. See if that helps. If the problem is not resolved then there isn’t really any more the woodworker can do.
    I generally cut out the resin pockets, but if it’s widespread, trying to salvage the piece isn’t worth the effort. Probably not what you wanted to hear.
    Best,
    Craig

    SW Pennsylvania

    #136435
    Joshua Nelson
    Participant

    Wiping the surface with acetone works fairly well.

    #137892
    laxmodin
    Participant

    heat up the plane lightly to take it off.

    resin becomes runny long before water boils. Be careful so you dont use the turpentine at the same time though..

    #137894
    BrianJ
    Participant

    I also re-read this and realized you are using figer jointed stock. Tough way to plane with the everchanging grain, how did you end up making out on this project?

    Ontario, Canada

    #137896
    Igor Kerstges
    Participant

    Sneak peek:
    Carpenter's bench final

    All in all the grain changing was a pain but manageable. I needed to take the planing through stages of rough planing (square and twist) through fine planing (flatness) and -with more than usual effort- smoothing. Special attention to a very fine plane setting for smoothing operation.

    For clearing the resin build-up I let it harden (somewhat) on the plane over-night and cleaned the plane sole in the morning on sandpaper. Worked best for me..

    I will add some more with details after the weekend.

    Attachments:
    #137954
    Alien8
    Participant

    Cool bench.
    It’ll serve you well I guess. Now you can start to marr it up (if you haven’t already). The first thing I did after installing my vise was to test croscutting some wood. In all my enthusiasm my saw went right into my bench :-S

    Also a nice room to live in 😛

    For the resin : I’d suggest you don’t sand it off, you’ll quickly get your plane out of flat.
    I just use white spirit and a little elbow grease to get it off. Sometimes I have to soak my rag a couple of times. Come to think of it, WD40 works too.

    Have fun
    Diego

    #137957
    Alien8
    Participant

    another thing: how do you get that picture to show up in your post like that. Been searching high and low to find a way to do that !
    Diego

    #137967
    Igor Kerstges
    Participant

    Not to worry, the bench has it’s scars from day one already.. I’m considering to make an insert from some hard wood where the saw always runs next to the vise..

    For the picture to show up in a post, I first type my post and include my file to attach. After it has been uploaded, I then open the picture in my browser to find the link which I copy to the clip-board. I then edit my post, I place the cursor where I want the picture to appear. Choose the IMG button and paste the link in the dialog that appears.

    Save it and voila! 🙂

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