Wooden Beverage Holder

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    Topic
  • #124363
    Matt McGrane
    Participant

    This project was based on a recent “Wood” magazine project. The box from 1/2″ pine, dividers from 1/4″ pine, bottom 1/8″ pine, handle started as 3/4″ pine, all sawn and planed from 3/4″ stock. Finished with 3 coats of shellac and two coats of poly/oil/mineral spirits blend.

    Here’s the unusual thing – you’ll notice the tall ends are oriented vertically while the sides are horizontal. This required that dovetail pins be cut into the side grain of the end pieces. I know that makes the pins very delicate; in fact, one pin popped off and had to be glued back on. I added 1/8″ dowels through the tails to reinforce the joints. I couldn’t figure out a way to join the sides with the ends and have the grain oriented properly for dovetails – the tall ends really needed to be vertical for strength. I thought about putting dadoes in the sides and overhanging them past the ends, but I don’t like that look. Any suggestions would be welcomed.

    Anyway, now to send to my friend who I know will figure out what beverages to use this for.

    Matt, Northern California - Started a blog in 2016: http://tinyshopww.blogspot.com/

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Viewing 9 replies - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
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  • #124372
    Florian
    Participant

    @jfe1978

    Hey Matt,

    I agree that the holder probably looks best the way you made it. Is the bottom glued on?
    The first thing I thought of was mortise and tenon to connect the sides to the end and I still do but to achieve a similar look like with the dovetails instead of a single tenon one could use two or three through tenons and maybe wedge them like the ones used for the walking cane.
    All of this will not affect the taste of the content 😉

    I enjoy working wood in Germany.

    #124373
    Salko Safic
    Participant

    @salko

    I like it I think it looks cool.

    https://journeymansjournel.wordpress.com
    The Lost Scrolls of HANDWORK
    (Hand tool only woodworking magazine)

    #124376
    chemical_cake
    Participant

    @chemical_cake

    Good idea, nice job.

    I was going to suggest a couple of mortise and tenons in answer to your question but I see Florian beat me to it. While us woodworkers will notice it’s an unusual use of dovetails, I doubt most people would; I would also have complete confidence in the joint’s strength because of the substantial long-grain glue surface, the dowels giving you that added peace of mind if you ever fill it with six bottles of champagne!

    I’m also interested to know how the bottom is attached. I would be a little concerned about it cracking if it’s not well supported, 1/8 is quite thin.

    Matt

    Southampton, UK

    #124380
    Salko Safic
    Participant

    @salko

    I’m starting to think we are over concerning ourselves way too much with strength/intergrity of our joints. In my opinion you choose the joint for the type of project we choose and what will be the intended function of that finished piece. We look at mass produced proucts and we know it will not stand up to the tests of time due to cost saving methods of poor material and corner cutting but I have noticed more than once and here is a great example which is the reason why I am writing this.

    Christopher Schwartz produced a video where he made a tool box with nothing more than butt joints held by screws and his claim was that this will hold your life time to support his claim he showed a sample tool box that is 100+ years old probably 130 years I think he said. It was an amatuer who built it as the work was shoddy but it was glued and nail butt jointed through out. If that can hold up for 130 years and counting I wouldn’t even think twice about your beverage holder or your next tool box and so on.

    I made a shelf cupboard with nothing more than rebates and wooden nails not long ago I would love to see this piece in 100 years time, I am confident that this will out live generations in fact the wood would rott but the joints would not come apart.

    https://journeymansjournel.wordpress.com
    The Lost Scrolls of HANDWORK
    (Hand tool only woodworking magazine)

    #124381
    Derek Long
    Participant

    @delong1974

    It’s always good to have a proper holder for the beverages. Let’s you drink more at one sitting without going to the fridge. 🙂

    Looks good!

    Derek Long
    Denver, Colorado

    #124382
    Matt McGrane
    Participant

    @mattmcgrane

    Hey guys, thanks for the comments.

    @jfe1978
    @chemical_cake
    The bottom is simply glued to the box. There is “long grain to long grain” glue joints on the sides and “long grain to end grain” on the ends. I’m hoping the bottom doesn’t fall out as my friend is bringing beverages up from his basement. It’s only about 1/8″ thick because that is what was left over after creating some of the other thin stock.

    I forgot to put in the original post – this is 9+3/4″ x 6+3/4″ x 10+1/2″ tall.

    I like the idea of M&T joints. I still didn’t want to have any surface overhanging another. The original article showed something like an oversized box joint. Kind of like M&T, but on the edge (not the center) of the mortise piece.

    Matt, Northern California - Started a blog in 2016: http://tinyshopww.blogspot.com/

    #124383
    chemical_cake
    Participant

    @chemical_cake

    Of course strength shouldn’t be the only factor influencing joint choice, but it should still be a pretty major one. Depending on whether you’re building boxes or bridges, that will lead you down different paths.

    It’s also worth remembering that the stuff that falls apart is no longer here to be counted.

    Southampton, UK

    #124385
    chemical_cake
    Participant

    @chemical_cake

    Above @salko.

    I think I know what you mean by ‘oversized box joints’, it seems to be a very in-vogue look at the moment, particularly on woodworking sites / plans. I suspect it’s popular with some woodworkers because it draws attention to the joint, it can look quite good though sometimes I think it looks a bit childish, like the slot-together furniture you get in a playroom.

    Matt

    Southampton, UK

    #124387
    Peter George
    Participant

    @pjgeorge

    I like the dovetails.

    Hmmm, my home brewed beer is in a closet in the basement …

    I think I need to make one of those.

    Peter in
    Biggar SK
    "New York is big, but this is Biggar"

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