Wooden body plane restoration

  • Creator
    Topic
  • #457055
    Tony Lenge
    Participant

    I just bought a wooden plane and it has a loose handle. It wobbles in the mortise that it sits in. There are no screws. I would like to tighten the handle. What is the best way to remove the handle and the proper way to reattach? Thanks to anyone responding with advice.

Viewing 12 replies - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)
  • Author
    Replies
  • #457176
    Edmund
    Participant

    @etmo

    Depending on what’s wrong (why is it wobbling?) there might be a number of possible avenues.

    If the handle base (the “tenon” which goes into the mortise) has lost material, say from rot, you could make a new base / tenon, mount the old handle onto the new base (or just make a new handle as well), and glue it into the existing mortise.

    If there’s damage to the walls of the mortise, and even a perfect fit won’t do because the mortise walls are no longer strong enough for the job, you could position the handle in the mortise, keeping it in position with something as simple as masking tape, then pour in epoxy to surround the tenon. The epoxy will reinforce the mortise walls, fill all gaps and permanently anchor the handle in whatever position you set.

    There are probably many other options, too.

    #457481
    David Perrott
    Participant

    @dperrott

    I had a wooden plane and the handle was loose, no screws. It was a simple matter of gluing it. I used hide glue. I have another one that is loose. I have glued it but there is bit too much of a gap. When I have some veneer on hand I’ll glue that onto the handle to close the gap. I like using hide glue (for everything) especially these types of repairs. If it ever needs fixed again its very simple to work with a hide glue joint.

    #457714
    Richard Guggemos
    Participant

    @rickgugg

    Tony Lenge,

    I hear what you’re saying. The handle is loose and won’t come out. I have that problem on my wooden jointer.

    Solutions for repair aren’t useful until you can get the handle out, right?

    I don’t have your answer. My impression is that usually, the mortise is undercut on one end and the handle fits under this. I’m guessing that usually its the rear of the mortise where this occurs because the rear of the handle is where there is most upward force.

    Regardless, I can’t get vertical movement (or longitudinal either) at either end of the handle.

    My plane does have, however, several large checks. These don’t overall hinder the use of the plane, but at least one of them has a role in the lateral handle movement.

    It has been suggested to me that that the following will often close (by how much I don’t know) checks:
    1) remove the iron and wedge.
    2) securely tape over the mouth of the plane and any open cracks on the sole.
    3) set the plane somewhere flat and level (I’d put it in some sort of container just to avoid a mess).
    4) fill the mouth with natural linseed oil.
    5) let things sit until the linseed oil seeps out of the ends (I suspect this takes more than overnight).

    At this point, you can pour out the remaining linseed oil. You’ll probably have to let it set for a while (week? more? IDK) to stop sweating linseed oil. But, the checks will supposedly be shrunk at this time, and the plane should be closer to its original (or last) square and dimensions. And, sometimes, the handle will have tightened up.

    Let me be clear. I haven’t tried this (yet). I’m just passing on something I read.

    If you try this, let us know how it goes. Likewise, if you learn of another way to free the handle, please pass that on too.

    Thanks and good luck,

    Rick G.

    #457858
    Tony Lenge
    Participant

    @two-pi

    Thanks for the reply and suggestions. After closer examination and valently trying to convince the handle to come out, I noticed two small brads at the base of the handle. I pulled the brads out and out came the handle. The mortise looks good so now I will use Hyde glue and reattach. I am also going to try your linseed suggestion to see if it reduces the checking. Thanks again.

    #457859
    Tony Lenge
    Participant

    @two-pi

    Thanks

    #457861
    Tony Lenge
    Participant

    @two-pi

    Thanks see my reply below

    #458225
    Alan
    Participant

    @alan141

    @dperrott David, is Hide Glue the same as Pearl Glue?

    #458460
    David Perrott
    Participant

    @dperrott

    Yea, sometimes its listed like that. I use hot hide glue and heat it up in a crock pot. I used pre made liquid hide glue once. I like this type glue. Cleans up easier, gives more open time and if you need to, you can unglue a joint. Only had to do that once.

    #458992
    Tony Lenge
    Participant

    @two-pi

    I see Titebond makes a liquid hide glue. Does anyone recommend it?

    #459001
    David Perrott
    Participant

    @dperrott

    Thats the liquid hide glue I used. It seemed fine. I had a friend make some things with it and he liked it. Less of a mad dash during glue up.

    #459104
    Dave Ring
    Participant

    @davering

    Titebond liquid hide glue is good stuff and is the wood glue that I use the most. Make sure to check the date on the bottle. It’s supposed to have a shelf life of one year, which might be conservative but why take chances?

    Dave

    #459987
    Tony Lenge
    Participant

    @two-pi

    Mr.Ring and mr.Perrott, thanks for the reply. I ordered the glue and will use it to reattach that handle.

Viewing 12 replies - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)

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