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  • #131203
    Eddy Flynn
    Participant

    hi all I’ve just bought these two planes on ebay for £15 for the two,does anyone know of any videos that show the restoration of these types of plane, maybe Paul could put this on his things to do list if he ever the time

    wooden-plow-planes-2-

    Eddy .. Liverpool, Merseyside, UK
    ,

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    #131207
    Derek Long
    Participant

    Eddy,

    I don’t know about videos, but @MattMcGrane fixed one up here awhile ago, maybe he has some advice for you.

    Derek Long
    Denver, Colorado

    #131214
    Matt McGrane
    Participant

    Hi Eddy. Congratulations on the find. Did you get any extra irons with them? I hope you can get them working nicely. Looks like the iron is in upside down in the plane on the left in picture 2.

    Yours are both wedge arm plow planes whereas the one I rehabilitated is a screw arm. At least you don’t have bad threads to worry about. I did a lot of research when I rehab’ed my plane. I found some info searching google and Lumberjocks. The best article I found was “The Care and Feeding of Wooden Plow Planes”, by Zach Dillinger (http://www.wkfinetools.com/tRestore/planes/plowPlaneCare-Dillinger/plowPlanes-02.asp). I also have Garrett Hack’s “The Handplane Book”, which talks a bit about plow planes and how they work.

    Here’s what I did. First, I cleaned up the whole thing. Dillinger advocates cleaning by using paste wax and a soft cloth. The wax should keep most of the patina and clean off gross dirt. Since I’m not a collector, I decided to be more aggressive and not care about the patina. I used sandpaper and scrapers on the wood parts, re-oiling after I was finished. Made a nice difference in appearance.

    Dillinger also says never to remove metal screws from an old wooden body because it’s possible they’ll never hold properly again. The wood might have decayed, etc. But I didn’t let that bother me. I took off the skates and cleaned them of rust and dirt using citric acid, sandpaper and wire wheel. I cleaned up all the screws with a wire wheel in the drill.

    My plow has a metal depth stop adjuster and I removed that and cleaned it up using the same method as above for the steel parts and just the wire wheel on the brass parts.

    I also took apart the fence assembly – the fence connects to the screw arm with screws and I cleaned up these screws as above. I also had to shim one of these joints to better align the fence.

    When the skates are reinstalled, their bottom edges must be in line with each other (I had to file mine to get them more in line) and they should be parallel to the bottom of the plane body. The skates should also extend down from the body at a 90° angle.

    I had to work the iron quite a bit to remove some nicks, but you know how that’s done.

    All for now. If I think of anything else, I’ll let you know. Let us see some pics when you’re done.

    Matt, Northern California - Started a blog in 2016: http://tinyshopww.blogspot.com/

    #131218
    Salko Safic
    Participant

    Bill Anderson has a video on restoring these planes and moulding planes at the wood n shop.

    https://journeymansjournel.wordpress.com
    The Lost Scrolls of HANDWORK
    (Hand tool only woodworking magazine)

    #131228
    Eddy Flynn
    Participant

    @mattmcgrane thank you so much for your reply I hope I can do it justice, I was going to ask the question spot the mistake(the iron) but I thought i’d let you spot it. also thanks derek and salko

    Eddy .. Liverpool, Merseyside, UK
    ,

    #442575
    Ben Lehnert
    Participant

    Just an update on the link @mattmcgrane gave, since I just found it to lead into a dead end…the article can be found here: The Care and Feeding of the Wooden Plow Plane

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