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Viewing 15 posts - 61 through 75 (of 83 total)
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  • #630206
    Colin Scowen
    Participant

    From the look inside, they seem to be very similar. The Amazon look inside does show the rebated vise faces that Mark68 might find useful.
    Amazon version looks more polished though. Maybe I’ll add it to my Christmas list 🙂

    #630211
    Mark68
    Participant

    Interesting book that, I may have to invest.

    Thank you for the advice.

    "Sawdust? I think you'll find that's man-glitter."

    #631237
    Mark68
    Participant

    Almost finished the workbench and it’s got a nice minor wobble in the legs. This aids my planing technique as my whole body rocks too and fro in time with the wobble.

    What do you mean it’s not supposed to wobble? Oh… 😀

    How best to get rid of a wobble in the legs? I’ve tried planing but it’s r/tough going. Do I press on with the plane or is there another technique I should use?

    "Sawdust? I think you'll find that's man-glitter."

    #631275
    david o’sullivan
    Participant

    If the bench top is flat then you can shorten a leg .what you describe sounds like twisted frame . Have a look at Pauls chair making video you will get what I mean

    "we can learn what to do, by doing" Aristotle

    #631280
    Mark68
    Participant

    Could be a twist. Just to clarify, it’s rocking as shown in the pic below, so the plan is to take a mil or two off the two highlighted legs.

    "Sawdust? I think you'll find that's man-glitter."

    Attachments:
    #631347
    Larry Geib
    Participant

    A twisted or not flat bench could be what is making your bench rock.

    Equally as likely is a floor that’s not level. Either ( or both) can cause your bench to rock.

    Before you do anything else, you needs to figure out which it is. Paul has tutorials on using winding sticks to flatten a top and on leveling a piece of furniture.

    A level will tell you if it’s the floor.

    #631406
    Mark68
    Participant

    So I can’t simply adjust a leg or two to because if I did that, the workbench top itself might not be flat?

    I have a good inch (at least) I could take off the legs and its height would still be optimal for me, so there’s plenty of room for remedial work to be carried out on those legs if needs be. The plan is to remove the wobble and then do the finishing touches on the benchtop itself.

    "Sawdust? I think you'll find that's man-glitter."

    #631427
    Colin Scowen
    Participant

    Remember that flat, level and co-planar are different things. You need to identify where the issue is. Then you can decide if / how to fix it based on how much of an issue it really is. If it is possible, then try slacking off the fastenings, and check again. It may be that the assembly has induced some distortion. If it has, then do them back up again one at a time, to see which ones are causing the issue.
    A top that is flat is the ideal, as this then becomes a reference plane for the rest (and a lot of the work you will do in the future as well).
    Depending on how often you may want to move the workbench, you could also shim one of the legs rather than permanently removing material. I haven’t seen the workbench build videos, but if the legs were all the same length, the joinery square, and the legs perpendicular to the top, then it may be your floor, as suggested above. In which case I would find a shim that fixed the issue, and tempermanently attach it to the one leg.
    FWIW, my workbench is flat, is not level, but does not rock, as I have found a sweet spot on my non flat and non level floor. Hasn’t stopped me so far.

    #631432
    Mark68
    Participant

    Ok thank you for the information.

    I think it is a combination of an uneven floor and probably wood distortion. I’ll check it out.

    "Sawdust? I think you'll find that's man-glitter."

    #631460
    Benoît Van Noten
    Participant

    I didn’t pay enough attention when planing the underside of my bench-top. It is probably slightly twisted.
    When I screwed the bench-top to the leg-frame bearers, the whole workbench was rocking.
    I placed a shim (in your case on the left side and on the tool-well side) between the bench-top and the bearer of the corresponding leg-frame.
    Then screwed again the bench-top to the bearer.
    My workbench is not rocking anymore.

    In other words, to see if it would work for you,
    – place the workbench where your intend to use it;
    – unscrew the bench-top from the bearer from one leg-frame;
    – verify that now the four feet are resting on the ground;
    – identify where there is a gap between the bench-top and the bearer;
    – place a shim in the gap;
    -screw again the bench-top to the bearer.

    #631498
    Mark68
    Participant

    Well, I turned the bench 90degrees so it would be exposed to the bigger window and more natural light, and the rocking has gone! There’s a bit of luck. I had to put two pieces of leather (shims) under the two left legs as it wasn’t quite flat. Once I did that and spent the next couple of hours planing, I now have a workbench that sits squarely on the ground and is pretty much flat all over.

    Tomorrow I tackle the vise – assuming my leather turns up.

    Thanks all for the advice and help. Much [i]much[/i] appreciated

    "Sawdust? I think you'll find that's man-glitter."

    #632123
    Benoît Van Noten
    Participant

    The second part of my comment started with:
    – place the workbench where your intend to use it;

    Still might be useful if one day you place your workbench elsewhere. (and there is no need to trim any leg).

    #632130
    Mark68
    Participant

    The second part of my comment started with:
    – place the workbench where your intend to use it;

    Still might be useful if one day you place your workbench elsewhere. (and there is no need to trim any leg).

    Yes, I did read that part. I’ve had experience in the past with wobbly tables, where I’ve shifted them slightly to make them stable.

    I honestly cannot see me moving the workbench anywhere else, not unless I have a second window fitted.

    "Sawdust? I think you'll find that's man-glitter."

    #633439
    Mark68
    Participant

    Apart from applying the finish, my workbench is practically done so I’m now looking at fitting the drawer.

    At 16m 9s of the video below:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kIdutuqiOGw

    Paul says his bearer has already been “cut to length” but I’m not sure what length that is. Does anyone know?

    Thank you.

    "Sawdust? I think you'll find that's man-glitter."

    #633666
    Sven-Olof Jansson
    Participant

    Mark,

    From the video on WWMC (don’t know if it differs from the one on Youtube), it seems that the bearers screwed into the aprons can be of any length that will fit between the wedges of the legs and the vice.

    Sven-Olof Jansson
    London, UK; Boston, MA

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