Workbench Vice

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 33 total)
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  • #6614
    Scott
    Participant

    I’d love to see one of those in action. Think he’s right in saying it has to be seen to be believed! Have you read Tony’s book? It’s an incredible read – he does absolutely everything by hand and explains it all really well. George.

    Thanks for the recommendation. I will have to get his book. His site has a good deal of information when you follow the links on the margin.

    -Scott

    -Scott Los Angeles

    #6615
    ejpotter
    Participant

    Scott,

    There’s a lot of overlap between Konovaloff’s book and website, with the website being mostly extracts from the book.  There is a little more in the book, though.

     

    Just moved to NE Ohio

    #7086
    jgust747
    Participant

    Has anyone looked at or used Northern Industrial Woodworker’s Vise — 9in (http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200413942_200413942)?

    Dallas, Texas

    #7140
    Scott
    Participant

    Johan-

    I have never tried that vise, but I cannot see how it would be possible to manufacture a quality vise that would retail for $35. The parts of a vise are under considerable, continuous pressure during use. In my opinion, you should seek a quality reputation when purchasing a new or used vise.

     

     

    -Scott Los Angeles

    #7143
    Phillip
    Participant

    Anyone consider this one from Veritas?  You could install it with the back jaw protruded from the bench top, like Paul teaches us.  Thoughts?

    http://www.leevalley.com/US/Wood/page.aspx?p=67755&cat=1,41659

    #7147
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Has anyone used the leg type vise, the more I read about it the more tempted I get to go for it. HaHa the more I read the more confused I get as to witch one to go for. It’s make my mind up time, bench is nearly finished 🙂

    #7152
    David Gill
    Participant

    Ken

    From the photo it does not look very deep, it would be worth checking the width depth and opening capacity against the other vices you are considering

     

    Wigan, Lancs. England :

    #7154
    Florian
    Participant

    Hey Ken,

    since you are the master of links 😉 you probably know the following one:

    http://lumberjocks.com/CartersWhittling/blog/series/5198

    It’s a workbench series of a – I consider – very talented young man. He made a leg vise and and a tail vise using his own wooden screws and so on. It’s nicely explained and comes along with pictures and videos.

    Florian

    I enjoy working wood in Germany.

    #7163
    ejpotter
    Participant

    Phil, that’s a Veritas-branded vise, so you’re pretty much guaranteed high quality.  They always sell good quality stuff, but they only put their brand on the best, usually designed in-house.

    Johan, I took a look at that vise and had the same thought as Scott.  I recently picked up the Czech-made face vise from leevalley.com, which Paul has moderately recommended and bought for the NY school.  It weighs in around 40lbs, and every quality face vise I’ve seen has been in this range.  That Northern Tools vise was listed at 13.5lbs.  Seems like the castings must be very thin, and maybe they used hollow tubes for guide rods.

    Ken, I have a leg vise on my bench.  I bought the hardware from Benchcrafted ( http://www.benchcrafted.com/GlideVise.html ).  I currently have the standard adjustable pin-stop variety, but this is less useful when following the Paul Sellers method.  Paul uses the quick-release and auto-width adjustment features of his vise constantly.  For instance, he’ll work on an edge and then quickly flip the piece longitudinally in the vise to work on the face.  With the pin-stop leg vise, you have to constantly switch the pin back and forth.  This is sometimes a bigger hassle than others, and usually when it becomes annoying, I figure out a different way to do the work.  But if I was just starting and didn’t have a vise yet, I would go with the cheaper face vise style that Paul uses.  Having said that, my new lust is for Richard Maguire’s pinless leg vise on my next bench.  Not currently in the budget.  http://www.theenglishwoodworker.com/shop/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=65_71&products_id=264

    Just moved to NE Ohio

    #7165
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Thanks guys, decisions, decisions 🙂

    #7168
    jgust747
    Participant

    Thank you for the reply’s. $150 for just the vise is a little bit out of my reach right now.

    Dallas, Texas

    #7169
    John-Paul Treen
    Participant

    If someone’s based in the UK, I can’t see how, if someone’s looking for a low-price (less than £60) vise, they’re not going for an old, second-hand ‘Made in England’ Record 51 or 52.

    Sure, they’re generally collection-only, but the smaller of the two (the 52?) will go through the post. I got one only a few weeks ago for less than £50 delivered from eBay.

    There are enough of them about that you can pretty much always get hold of one. You can generally restore a rusty one, and most of them have got a lot of life left in them.

    Sure, there are other brands of old ‘Made in England’ or ‘Made in the USA’ vices, but at that price for that level of convenience – if you’re on a budget – why look beyond them?

    #7177
    Scott
    Participant

    I just looked up my local classified web site and a quality vintage Wilton quick-release vise appeared for $75. Just an example of how you can find a quality vise (with thick old-school castings and threading) for a reasonable sum.

    -Scott Los Angeles

    #7182
    Redtail
    Participant

    I got lucky and found an old Columbian quick release 10″ vice at a yard sale for $25 about three years ago. Thing weighs a ton and is the same exact model I used in high school wood shop.This company supplied schools across the US and was bought out by Wilton a while back. Saw some on ebay last week for good prices. Great vices.

    West Virginia, USA

    #7208
    moyariffic
    Participant

    I’ve myself been considering a twin screw vise (Moxon) from Tools for Working Wood.  I may be in a different boat than others, insofar as I didn’t build Paul’s bench.  Instead, I built the Underhill portable bench.  Portability is a premium for me (I’m a grad student and a renter, so I need to be flexible about where I store woodshop tools and my ability to move them).  Plus, I like being able to move the bench outside on a sunny day.  This bench, in combination with holdfasts and a Veritas Wonder Dog, works great when I need to hold something to the surface of the bench.  But vertical holding, oy, that’s a different story.   For a while, I’ve been getting away with holdfasts through the apron or handscrew clamps when I needed secure a board for dovetailling.  But durn it, a vise just looks so much easier and more secure for these applications.

    The trouble is that to maintain portability, I need a vise that either: 1) doesn’t extend very far into the depth of the bench, which interferes with the legs closing shut; or 2) detaches quickly from the bench.  I’ve been scouring the internet, and haven’t found much.  I called the folks at TFWW, and Ben – who was very helpful – recommended that I install the bench on bench hardware directly into the face of the bench (or through the apron).  Seems like a good solution that lets me maintain portability.

    Anybody have experience with this type of vise?  It looks a little less convenient than simple one-handed quick release vises, but it’s also ligther and easier for me to deal with (and perhaps more secure?).  Any other ideas about how to deal with this?

    Justin

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