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Yet another picture frame

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  • #314303
    Alien8Alien8
    Participant

    Not a picture frame, but close…

    The SWMBO wanted a frame for a mirror we were given. It had to be oak. No problem right?
    Well, this turned out to be a challenge due to the sheer size alone. The thing is roughly 1m40 by 1m20.
    So we started to mill some boards.

    milled boards

    [attachment file=314304]

    I decided a simple chamfer as the profile would do just fine. I saw a similar thing in a shop somewhere and took a few quick measures.

    profile
    [attachment file=314305]

    I made a matching board to help support the weight of the wood, just to be able to shoot the miters on the shooting board. I didn’t want any glue squeeze out on the joint, since this will be difficult to plane out, so I sort of prefinished them.

    prefinish
    [attachment file=314306]

    clamping the large boards is challenging…
    This is something I found on Pinterest.

    first joint
    [attachment file=314307]

    • This topic was modified 1 year, 8 months ago by Alien8Alien8.
    • This topic was modified 1 year, 8 months ago by Alien8Alien8. Reason: Pics inserted
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  • #314310
    Alien8Alien8
    Participant

    @alien8

    follow up…

    Glueing the whole frame together was another even bigger challenge. Paul made it look so easy in the videos.
    I had a ratchet strap and made some corner blocks.
    Moved my bench out of the way and worked on the floor, I simply couldn’t move around it otherwise. This way I was working from the middle.

    frame glue up
    [attachment file=314311]

    I figured a few simple kerfed miters weren’t going to be strong enough. The mirror itself weighed about 30 kg. I didn’t want any chance of this thing falling apart… 7 years of more misfortune don’t look very attractive…
    So I added dovetailed keys as reinforcement.

    dovetailed miter reinforcement

    [attachment file=314312]

    Ended up using beech as it is nicely straight grained. I mixed this in after seeing it in the chessboard series.

    finished miter

    [attachment file=314313]

    Finally in position, finish was 3 layers shellac and wax finish.
    Attached the backbreaker thing to the wall (totaled over 36 kg !!) using a French cleat.
    Kiki the house tiger is finally meeting her imaginary friend now.

    in it's final resting place

    [attachment file=314314]

    Here ya go
    Comments are appreciated
    Diego

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 8 months ago by Alien8Alien8.
    • This reply was modified 1 year, 8 months ago by Alien8Alien8. Reason: Pics added
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    #314319
    Bert Deketelebertd
    Participant

    @bertd

    Nice build! I like the dovetail splines and the chamfers.
    Some years ago I also made two big mirrorframes.
    I didn’t pre-finish mine and got some stains on the glass. Took me quite a while to get them off.

    (And I’m having a spare mirror that’s screaming for a frame :-))

    #314340
    WesleyWesley
    Participant

    @weslee

    Great post (and frame). Thanks for sharing!

    A friend of mine has asked to make him a frame for a huge poster. Even though the poster isn’t nearly as heavy as your mirror, I wasn’t sure about how to clamp the thing together.

    Just a question: why didn’t you use the clamps when glueing up? It seems like a lot of trouble to make those extra “Pinterest blocks” and then not use them.

    Wesley

    #314345
    Alien8Alien8
    Participant

    @alien8

    Thanks for the comments

    The clamps I used on the two halves, as it is nearly impossible to put pressure across the miter.
    Paul uses his vice and adds the splines immediately… Not really an option.

    I used the ratchet because I couldn’t put the clamps on and shift the two remaining joints to line up correctly.
    I was able to slowly apply tension and keep everything lined up. My floor isn’t exactly flat either…
    The 4 1/2 is there as a scientific method of applying some downward pressure .

    The ratchet is just as good an option as the clamping blocks, which took only a few minutes to make.
    Diego

    #314356
    Brett aka PheasantwwBrett aka Pheasantww
    Participant

    @pheasantww

    Can you talk a little more on how you did the dovetail splines? Specifically, how you cut the open for the spline then matched the spline to the opening. Thanks,

    Located in Honeoye Falls NY USA. The Finger Lakes region of Western NY.

    "If you give me 6 hours to fell a tree, I will take the first 4 to sharpen my axe" Abe Lincoln

    #314359
    Alien8Alien8
    Participant

    @alien8

    Hi Brett

    Paul used this in the chessboard.

    Just a 4 square long block of wood, plane a chamfer on both sides.
    Saw a rough 45 end on one end and mark it on both sides of the mitered joint. Saw in between the lines and chop out the waste. Basically like a large dovetail, because that’s what it is. Then tap the dovetailed piece in and saw the excess off, like you can see in the 2nd pic in the 2nd post (the long end is already sawn off).

    I did make a few practice joints, don’t go directly on your masterpiece… I you didn’t make a proper fit, you’re likely to brake up the frame….

    Diego

    • This reply was modified 1 year, 8 months ago by Alien8Alien8.
    • This reply was modified 1 year, 8 months ago by Alien8Alien8.
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    #314418
    Brett aka PheasantwwBrett aka Pheasantww
    Participant

    @pheasantww

    Very cool, Thanks

    Located in Honeoye Falls NY USA. The Finger Lakes region of Western NY.

    "If you give me 6 hours to fell a tree, I will take the first 4 to sharpen my axe" Abe Lincoln

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