Alan

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  • #651454
    Alan
    Participant

    Are you really trying to follow in Paul’s footsteps, right down to the same make and type of pencil he uses? The ‘Red Stanley Marking Knife’ phenomenon again, but now with pencils?
    Someone asked “What type of watch does Paul wear when chiselling?”
    Another asked “What is the correct weight of Thorex hammer that Paul uses?”
    You’re missing the point.
    If Paul suggested Running Shoes for jogging, would you ask what size he wears? 😂

    Try out different types of pencil on your own, and make your own mind up. Buy a pack of mixed grades. Some pencils work better than others, depending on the wood. Some choose to use red ballpoint pen.

    Have you considered that Paul is using a deliberately thick, bold, soft line so it shows up well on camera. So we can see what he’s marking. You wouldn’t want to replicate that.
    Besides, it’s the knife-line you follow, not the pencil line. Pencil is only there as an interim visual aid.

    #651455
    Alan
    Participant

    Are you really trying to follow in Paul’s footsteps, right down to the same make and type of pencil he uses? The ‘Red Stanley Marking Knife’ phenomenon again, but now with pencils?
    Someone asked “What type of watch does Paul wear when chiselling?”
    Another asked “What is the correct weight of Thorex hammer that Paul uses?”
    You’re missing the point.
    If Paul suggested Running Shoes for jogging, would you ask what size he wears? 😂

    Try out different types of pencil on your own, and make your own mind up. Buy a pack of mixed grades. Some pencils work better than others, depending on the wood. Some choose to use red ballpoint pen.

    Have you considered that Paul is using a deliberately thick, bold, soft line so it shows up well on camera. So we can see what he’s marking. You wouldn’t want to replicate that.
    Besides, it’s the knife-line you follow, not the pencil line. Pencil is only there as an interim visual aid.

    #633629
    Alan
    Participant

    …and that’s how the Backsaw got its name!
    Romans had a sponge-on-a-stick for the toilet, but used a saw when scratching their back?
    Ask a hundred people, and you’ll get a hundred different answers. Its the same with Chip-Breaker, Frog… etc. Nailing down facts for your book is not going to be easy.

    #633260
    Alan
    Participant

    Saws often had wooden guards to cover and protect the teeth. These guards were tied in place with a simple length of string. One loop of string from guard to Hook, another loop from guard to Nib. The Nib being used as a forward anchor-point for that string, preventing it from slipping off the skewed back.

    I’ve no idea how accurate this theory is, but it seems quite plausible to me.

    #631154
    Alan
    Participant

    … and the guy who cuts “timber” is a “Lumberjack”. 😀

    We call them “Tree Fellers”. But the fella might be female.

    #631147
    Alan
    Participant

    Perhaps your mahogany base is too thick? Remove it when you’re near depth or try a thinner material, such as Ply.
    Vintage Stanley cutters were the same length as those by Record. Then Stanley changed to shorter ones (with the mushroom top). Paul might have been using a longer Record cutter in his Stanley router to reach the depth you see.

    #631096
    Alan
    Participant

    A mid-priced double-sided plate (400 grit/1000 grit) would be okay. £25-£35 GBP.

    There’s the inconvenience of having to turn it over, more work to get from 400 to 1000 in a single step, but for occasional use the combination works well. You’ll still have abrasive papers for initializing new acquisitions, and a strop for finnishing. Most of the time you’ll be using just the 1000 side to replenish an edge.

    Faithfull are pretty good value: FAIWKIT £28.
    Trend are popular too.

    #630448
    Alan
    Participant

    It’s probably a one-off homemade router, or a copy of a lesser-known make, minus the trademarks.

    Foundry workers often cast their own versions, or copied the pattern of commercial routers, to save money. I think they used up leftover molten metal at the end of a production run, or cast something small like this to test the mixture.

    Judging by the wooden knobs and patina, its probably early twentieth century. 1920’s-1940’s? If you know where it came from, there’s a slim chance you can look-up the name which is stamped into the wooden knob to learn more. For someone to have a namestamp made, they were probably woodworking for a living.

    Don’t worry about the lack of side fence. A block of wood screwed to the sole is far more effective. And a plough plane with fence for narrow boards.

    If you need an accurate depth-stop, a length of tubing slid over the threaded rod will be more accurate than any Stanley/Record depth gauge.

    If you can find two small nuts to match the thread, you’ll have an adjustable depth-stop which you can lock into place.

    #628916
    Alan
    Participant

    Hi Jerry,
    A lot of information is available in Paul’s blogs.
    Paul often discusses tools (old and new), woodworking methods, sharpening, and other topics of interest. If they’re not covered in a dedicated WWMC video, they’re usually found in one of his blogs.

    Rasps are discussed several times, and expanded upon in-depth.
    Just Google “paul sellers blog rasps” and you’ll find them.

    #623397
    Alan
    Participant

    I would have asked for a replacement PAX.
    Ask Thomas Flinn-Garlick to try it out before posting it to you.
    They should do the ‘banging of the back’. You just use it, and eventually sharpen it.

    Paul has a lot of experience straightening saws and plane irons. He makes it look straightforward. I wouldn’t be confident doing it. I’d only attempt it on old restorations, not on a new, expensive, quality saw.

    Or buy the LN you’d previously considered.
    Again, ask them to test it. It should have been checked.

    #622878
    Alan
    Participant

    It would make an ideal candidate for trying your own restoration methods; rust removal, rasping (the handle), grinding, polishing, etc., before working on something more important later on.

    #622847
    Alan
    Participant

    I would guess it was steam-softened in a steam oven enclosure.
    Then bent quickly while still hot and soft, to fit a Former Template.
    When cooled, it keeps the formed shape.

    #617583
    Alan
    Participant

    IMG_20191013_152256_hdr

    #617582
    Alan
    Participant

    You could try reducing the set with Paul’s two-hammer technique.

    Some people file one stroke on each side of the teeth after setting, but this might not apply to your Ship Point pattern. It looks as though its designed to work in both directions, more like a green-wood saw. Quick and rough.

    I have a similar one. From a Cabinet Maker’s toolchest. He only had top-quality saws. I never figured how this belonged in there. Mine has no set whatsoever. It just hacks through the wood. Nothing straight. Nothing tidy. I showed it to Paul. He suggested I resharpen and set as for a standard rip cut. Mine is just over 2 PPI. Here it is alongside a Disston Crosscut for scale.

    IMG_20191013_152256_hdr

    #617568
    Alan
    Participant

    I find it difficult to take advice from that guy in the video who thinks its a good idea to take a hapless little toddler and his dog scything with him in the long grass.
    Idiot + Scythe = Lost legs.
    I’d give him a wide berth.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 243 total)