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Viewing 13 posts - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)
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  • #313719
    bigbrowndog
    Participant

    Wait, are you complaining about my complaining about complainers?

    #313390
    bigbrowndog
    Participant

    I completely agree. I still don’t think there is any other woodworking teaching on the internet that comes close to WWMC.

    #312400
    bigbrowndog
    Participant

    Thank you all for the info.

    I imagine that if there is an apron on the bench then a series of dog holes and a holdfast would solve the problem of clamping to the bench when there is a long apron, also using a longer clamp. I too have often clamped to the bench while chopping dovetails especially, but this is only because I don’t have dog holes and a holdfast.

    Ed mentioned the incredible variety of ways to hold stuff down, and there is no doubt about that.

    Hoyt

    #312384
    bigbrowndog
    Participant

    Yeah I’m looking over the youtube videos again, and based on the construction of it I think your right.

    I have seen other bench styles that use an apron, with different types of vises, and use it with holdfasts. I am considering adding some shelves/drawers to my bench similar to the Sjoberg benches, or even Paul’s, and would like the option to use holdfasts too (now I am constantly clamping boards down to the bench top). If I had a lateral support at the same height I’m thinking I could eliminate the apron. Still thinking things through though.

    Thank you for posting back.

    Hoyt

    #312067
    bigbrowndog
    Participant

    Hi Maik,

    The workbench I use was designed for my previous life working with primarily machines, and is mobile with locking casters. While having a constantly moving workbench is NOT optimal, I still have managed to accomplish any planing task, including dimensioning, I’ve attempted. Lots of good advice here, but thought I’d add a little more reassurance that you dimensions will likely be fine.

    Hoyt

    #126633
    bigbrowndog
    Participant

    That dark finish is really cool, it makes the stool look very aged.

    Here is my stool I built a few weeks ago out of some oak I bought years ago and never new what to do with. I thought this project was a blast and I love the look of the wedged legs visible from the top.

    Attachments:
    #126457
    bigbrowndog
    Participant

    Hi Michael,

    I am also fairly new to hand tools and share your troubles. Too many times I have relied on waayyy to much shooting board work to get my boards square; I find jointing with the grain is a much easier task.

    What I decided for myself was to stop throwing down more money (my old wood working ethos) and concentrate on developing sound technique (my new woodworking ethos). Pauls method of putting the board in the vice vertical and using a sharp plane to plane down to a knife wall does work really well, and yes I’m still perfecting it. What also helped me was simply cutting a lot of scrap boards for random on the fly projects I came up with. Each time I can see myself bearing down on the saw just a little less, and holding the line a little more.

    My two cents, save your money and dont buy a dedicated shooting board plane. Use the money you were going to spend and buy some nice lumber, a bullnose plane, or some sweet molding planes, or a quick release vice (I really wish I had one of those).

    Hoyt

    #125682
    bigbrowndog
    Participant

    Hi Andy, i know is thread is a bit old, but here is my two cents; your dovetails in this thread look just like mine. i have been trying to master dovetails for a few weekends now. my first try with cheap pine from home depot didnt go well, by boards kept splitting because my joints were too tight, then i made them too loose, then i dovetailed my box side going opposite directions, now I’m searching this site for more tips and tricks! I am working on a small tray for my chisels out of Alder and having similar issues but my issues are getting smaller and less each time. I think its just a matter of cutting about 100 of these until you can achieve the beautiful dovetails Paul makes and some other I’ve seen on this site.

    Once i get my tray done. i will try and post some pictures. Do you have any recent photos of dovetails you’ve cut since this thread went up?

    Hoyt

    #125380
    bigbrowndog
    Participant

    Thank you for all the info. I went back out into the shop and actually ended up with the opposite conclusion than I thought I would get. I took everyone’s advice and working on a rough sawn piece of alder I picked up I planed and squared the four sides. I found that with my Olympia #4, the one I was having problems with, I could not adjust out the very noticeable tramlines, but with my new Woodriver #5 the lines were barely noticeable and easily sanded/scraped away.

    So I’m thinking at least at this point that my #4 might be better suited for me to convert into a scrub plane like Paul’s video. Then, as time and money permit, pick up another #4 plane. I’ll keep tinkering.

    Thank you again!

    #125355
    bigbrowndog
    Participant

    Awesome thanks for the info. I’m going to head back into the shop and try to evaluate if it’s my plane or me being too picky. Like I said I thought I was magically supposed to get this super smooth surface after hand planning and I’ve been working towards that but now I know I need to adjust my expectations a little bit.

    I will post some pictures when I get a chance to get back out there.

    Thank you again!

    #125352
    bigbrowndog
    Participant

    Yes I am talking about the tramlines (I learned some more terminology today!). I guess I’ve been under the impression that the plane should leave a smooth surface once I get to the level of taking very fine shavings. Am I wrong about this?

    Thank you for the advice.

    #125072
    bigbrowndog
    Participant

    My last dovetail venture I dovetailed one side and it was fine, then the next side I dovetailed it the wrong way so each side was going a differnet direction from the box front. I had extra stock so I cut a new side and as I was doing final fitting it split the cheap pine all the way down the side ruining it. I glued it back together and long story short the other side split in half too! I will be burning the enitre drawer.

    #123717
    bigbrowndog
    Participant

    I have wanted to see that too, but perhaps there is wisdom in not. I have used woodworking machines almost exclusively for 15 years and now that I’ve been watching Masterclasses i realize that I was constantly stuck in the mindset “how can i do this as fast as possible.” Personally I’m done with production style woodworking so maybe its better for me not to start thinking, “how fast can I cut this tenon?”

Viewing 13 posts - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)