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  • #599566
    cembalo8
    Participant

    I’m trying to view the new Desk Chair intro video — when I click on it, I get the page which requires Log In — haven’t able to access the video — any one else have this difficulty? Just a glitch in the usual procedures? Will check back later.

    #548493
    cembalo8
    Participant

    Fascinating on so many levels, not the least of which is the number of men involved and the training that must have taken place to coordinate the effort so smoothly — especially in the glue up that took place in 15 minutes. Thank you for posting this.

    #314336
    cembalo8
    Participant

    Very interesting set of posts. Nice job on the chest — including the parts about the bowing and how you adjusted for it. Enjoyed reading and looking at your pix. Hope every this fits well and is happy.

    #143089
    cembalo8
    Participant

    I have restored Stanley and Millers Falls planes that I bought on ebay (## 4-7). It is an addictive process. I use a solution called “Evaporust” on them first — it is oxalic acid which removes the rust without eating into the iron — does a great job of cleaning up all the parts (much easier to sand and get polished). I have also read that one can use dilute molasses (which contains oxalic acid) –it takes longer, but your shop smells like ginger bread cookies while the parts are in the solution.
    I use the “Scary Sharp” system for sharpening — it involves water proof sandpaper and a granite tile (easily available at places like Home Depot. Spray the tile with window cleaning solution, and the sandpaper adheres. I also use a Veritas honing guide which gives exact bevels; as I am working with planes and chisels, I touch up the edges freehand, and then strop them (as Paul demonstrates. This system does get them surgically sharp — I know — I cut my finger on a chisel one day; I applied the universal antiseptic (I stuck in my mouth), wrapped 2 bandaids around my finger and continued working; took off the band aid at home and added antiseptic ointment and more band aids; 3 days later, I took the band aids off — and the cut was completely healed — 6 months later I can’t even see the scar. Never felt a thing!
    As I have said, I have gotten a number of planes on ebay — I have given restored planes to friends who have never had a plane in such good shape and capable of taking such nice shavings. It is a process that is well worth repeating. (The down side, of course, is that other folks know this as well, and some of the planes are getting expensive on ebay — so I continue to look for rusted ones that show no evidence of cracks in their photos.

    #143086
    cembalo8
    Participant

    As I reread this, I realized that the primary problem with this idea is getting the blade to cut deeper into the wood on each pass. Haven’t figured that out yet.

    • This reply was modified 3 years, 5 months ago by cembalo8.
    #139346
    cembalo8
    Participant

    I have been using the system with abrasive paper (also known as “Scary Sharp” with great success. I use 3M papers that are water proof and spray water on a granite tile, then on the paper itself. I have a diamond lapping stone (actually steel, with embedded diamond dust, I guess) to re-establish bevels on badly worn plane and chisel blades; then I switch to sandpaper — 100, 220, 400, 800, 1000, 1500 — ending up with honing compound on a leather strop — gets things really sharp — I slipped and cut my finger with one of my chisels last spring; wrapped it with double bandages for several days and when I finally uncovered — healed –no sign of a scar now — that’s scalpel sharp.
    I did start this system with sandpaper from Harbor Freight — doesn’t work anywhere near as well as the 3m wet/dry papers. I also use a Veritas jig for both chisels and planes.

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